w14238 - NBER WORKING PAPER SERIES THE GREENNESS OF CITIES:...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: NBER WORKING PAPER SERIES THE GREENNESS OF CITIES: CARBON DIOXIDE EMISSIONS AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT Edward L. Glaeser Matthew E. Kahn Working Paper 14238 http://www.nber.org/papers/w14238 NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH 1050 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA 02138 August 2008 Glaeser thanks the Taubman Center for State and Local Government, the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston and the Manhattan Institute. Kahn thanks the Richard S. Ziman Center for Real Estate at UCLA. Kristina Tobio and Ryan Vaughn provided excellent research assistance. The views expressed herein are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Bureau of Economic Research. 2008 by Edward L. Glaeser and Matthew E. Kahn. All rights reserved. Short sections of text, not to exceed two paragraphs, may be quoted without explicit permission provided that full credit, including notice, is given to the source. The Greenness of Cities: Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Urban Development Edward L. Glaeser and Matthew E. Kahn NBER Working Paper No. 14238 August 2008 JEL No. Q5 ABSTRACT Carbon dioxide emissions may create significant social harm because of global warming, yet American urban development tends to be in low density areas with very hot summers. In this paper, we attempt to quantify the carbon dioxide emissions associated with new construction in different locations across the country. We look at emissions from driving, public transit, home heating, and household electricity usage. We find that the lowest emissions areas are generally in California and that the highest emissions areas are in Texas and Oklahoma. There is a strong negative association between emissions and land use regulations. By restricting new development, the cleanest areas of the country would seem to be pushing new development towards places with higher emissions. Cities generally have significantly lower emissions than suburban areas, and the city-suburb gap is particularly large in older areas, like New York. Edward L. Glaeser Department of Economics 315A Littauer Center Harvard University Cambridge, MA 02138 and NBER eglaeser@harvard.edu Matthew E. Kahn UCLA Institute of the Environment Box 951496 La Kretz Hall, Suite 300 Los Angeles, CA 90095-1496 and NBER mkahn@ioe.ucla.edu 2 I. Introduction While there remains considerable debate about the expected costs of global warming, a growing scientific consensus believes that greenhouse gas emissions create significant risks of climate change. A wide range of experts have advocated reducing individual carbon footprints and investing billions to reduce the risks of a major change in the earths environment (Stern, 2008)....
View Full Document

Page1 / 46

w14238 - NBER WORKING PAPER SERIES THE GREENNESS OF CITIES:...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online