marriage - Education and Marriage* A Comparative Study...

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* Correspondence to Josef Brüderl, Institute of Sociology, Konradstr. 6, 80801 München, Germany. We received valuable comments on earlier versions of this paper from Jan Hoem, Walter Müller, Peter Preisendörfer, and from many seminar participants: MASO-conference, Munich 1992; conference of the section on “Modeling and Simulation”, Mannheim 1993; seminar at the University of Stockholm, 1993; ISA World Congress, Bielefeld 1994. Education and Marriage * A Comparative Study Josef Brüderl Institute of Sociology, Munich Andreas Diekmann Institute of Sociology, Berne May 1997 Word Count: 13,900
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Education and Marriage A Comparative Study Abstract This paper investigates how education affects marriage behavior in three countries: the United States, West Germany, and the former East Germany. Following family economics, we postulate that for women a longer education decreases marriage rates both during education (institution effect) and after the degree has been obtained (human capital effect). For men family economics hypothesizes a delaying institution effect as well, but the human capital effect should increase marriage rates. Further considerations lead to the additional hypothesis that for younger birth cohorts these sex differences should vanish. Using event history methods we test these hypotheses with data from the “General Social Survey” (GSS 1972-1990) and from the German GSS counterpart (ALLBUS 1980-1988 and 1991). For the U.S. and West Germany, the observed marriage patterns mostly confirm our hypotheses. For East Germany, however, we observe very different marriage patterns. Our data show that there existed almost no institution effect in East Germany and that the human capital effect was totally absent. This was expected, because in this socialist country massive interventions through family policy created a very different institutional context.
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1 1. Introduction The following socio-demographic trends can be observed with relative uniformity throughout most industrialized societies despite all national peculiarities: increasing rates of participation in the secondary-schooling sector for both genders, a disproportional rise in involvement of women in education, and a growing participation of married women in the job market accompanied by a drop in marriage and remarriage rates, a rise in marriage age, dropping birth rates, and a sharp increase in divorces. It is uncontested that these developments will show substantial effects on demographic structures and social institutions. The relationship between these processes, however, is a field of lively research in the demographic literature and definite answers are only beginning to emerge from these discussions. The focus of this paper will be on the relationship between education and marriage. A highly
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This note was uploaded on 11/13/2010 for the course SOC 275953 taught by Professor Sullivan during the Spring '10 term at Seneca.

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marriage - Education and Marriage* A Comparative Study...

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