Lesson_6_Deductive_Validity - Lesson 6: Deductive Validity...

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Lesson 6: Deductive Validity
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In this lesson you will learn how to determine whether deductive arguments are valid or invalid. Deductive Validity
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Perhaps the most important concept in logic is the concept of deductive validity. Deductive arguments are either valid or invalid. A valid argument is a deductive argument in which the conclusion follows logically (i.e., with strict logical necessity) from the premises. In other words, a valid argument is a deductive argument in which it would be contradictory to assert all the premises as true and yet deny the conclusion. An invalid argument is a deductive argument in which the conclusion does not follow logically from the premises.
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Characteristics of a valid argument It cannot have true premises and a false conclusion If its premises are true, its conclusion must be true If its conclusion is false, it must have at least one false premise All of the information in the conclusion is also in the premises Characteristics of an invalid argument It can have true premises and a false conclusion. Even if its premises are true, it may have a false conclusion.
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This note was uploaded on 11/13/2010 for the course BA BA12345 taught by Professor Harry during the Spring '10 term at University of Economics and Technology.

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Lesson_6_Deductive_Validity - Lesson 6: Deductive Validity...

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