Chapter 7 - Chapter 7 Classical and Operant Conditioning According to the text classical conditioning is the process by which a previously neutral

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Chapter 7: Classical and Operant Conditioning According to the text, classical conditioning is the process by which a previously neutral stimulus acquires the capacity to elicit a response through association with a stimulus that already elicits a similar or related response. There is an unconditioned stimulus (elicits a reflective response) and response (reflective response elicited by a stimulus) which are due to the absence of learning. After conditioning and being associated with an unconditioned stimulus, they turn to conditioned responses and. In class, we learned that it was discovered by Ivan Pavlov when he found that the dogs that he had been researching with many times before began to salivate for food before even getting to the laboratory where they were given food in order to conduct and experiment. The dogs knew they would get food once they got there. Therefore they would begin to salivate before even being shown the food. According to class, classical conditioning can be used in real life by learning to like,
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This essay was uploaded on 04/03/2008 for the course PSY 101 taught by Professor Harrington during the Spring '08 term at Gloucester County College.

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Chapter 7 - Chapter 7 Classical and Operant Conditioning According to the text classical conditioning is the process by which a previously neutral

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