What We Hear Them Say May Not Be What They Mean

What We Hear Them Say May Not Be What They Mean -...

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“What We Hear Them Say May Not Be What They Mean,” the title of this article says it all. Children are so complex and yet so simple at the same time. They are complex in a way that we, as adults, do not always understand them, what they do and what they say. We misinterpret children a lot of the time, and this article helped me to understand how adults can ask the right questions to figure out what, exactly, children are trying to say. Children are simple in the way that they talk and act; they do not understand the things that adults understand, purely due to experience. In this article, the authors quote Jean Piaget when he says, “The work of a child is to play.” For instance, when children are witnesses on trial, they don’t think of it as a job or as work, they think of it as every day life, or play. Adults do not pay particular attention to the things children say or do, they do not take children seriously unless that small child is serving as a witness, and then adults begin to care. Young children, as opposed to preschoolers, produce a high percentage of accurate information based on their answer to the question, “Tell us what you remember.” Preschoolers, on the other hand, produce little or no information when asked what they remember. After a lot research, the authors of this article found that children ages 3-10 years old refer to a single person as “they,” instead of the man/woman, so when talking with children, adults may assume that children are talking about more than one person, when
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What We Hear Them Say May Not Be What They Mean -...

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