Emotion Lecture 14 2008 Culture and Emotion II

Emotion Lecture 14 2008 Culture and Emotion II - Culture...

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Culture and Emotion II Psychology of Emotion Lecture 13 Professor David Pizarro 1 Wednesday, March 31, 2010
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Part 1: Cultural differences in the sorts of things that give rise to emotions 1. Emotion Lexicon--do words affect what kinds of emotions we experience? - Perhaps more likely to focus on or remember certain emotions but probably not constrained by language 2. Antecedent/Eliciting Conditions - There are some differences in the sorts of events that trigger emotions 3. Appraisals - Same appraisal dimensions used, but difference in interpretation of events (is it a threat? depends on deFnition of “threat”) 2 Wednesday, March 31, 2010
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Actual Differences in Emotional Experience? It has often been observed (ethnographically, as well as colloquially) that some cultures seem to be more or less “emotional” than others Imagine that a situation that universally gives rise to anger/sadness/happiness across all cultures. Would people in some cultures simply be more angry/sad/happy? 3 Wednesday, March 31, 2010
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Differences in Emotionality Across Cultures? True, or just stereotypes? 4 Wednesday, March 31, 2010
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5 Wednesday, March 31, 2010
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Differences in Emotionality Across Cultures? True, or just stereotypes? Large body of evidence showing differences in emotionality across cultures. Much of this research has focused on Asian (esp. Japanese and Chinese) vs. Caucasian (esp. Americans) But also shown across various cultures and subcultures 6 Wednesday, March 31, 2010
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General fndings Some cultures show emotion more than others Americans more likely to express emotions More likely to laugh out loud in public Americans more likely express anger across a variety oF social situations Compared to Japanese students, American students reported experiencing emotions longer and more intensely, and report more bodily symptoms (Matsumoto, Kudoh, Scherer, & Wallbott, 1988) 7 Wednesday, March 31, 2010
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“Culture of Honor” Subcultural Differences-The “Culture of Honor” in the Southern U.S. (Cohen, Nisbett, Bowdle, & Schwarz, 1996) In response to insult, southerners displayed more anger, were more physiologically aroused, and gave stronger shocks to a confederate 8 Wednesday, March 31, 2010
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Wallace Friesen (1972) Compared Japanese vs. American students who were watching a flm depicting a disgusting surgical procedure Japanese students were much more “stone- Faced” than American students (when watching flm in the presence oF an authority fgure) We’ll get back to this study. .. 9 Wednesday, March 31, 2010
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Apparent Cultural Differences in Emotionality But why? Physiological Differences? Genetic differences in physiological response/ reactivity?
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Emotion Lecture 14 2008 Culture and Emotion II - Culture...

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