4bl-lab-8 - Ross Miller 503290136 Lab 8 Diffraction...

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Ross Miller 503290136 Lab 8: Diffraction Partners: Sam Ahn and Andre Svadjian TA: Steve Suh Session 6
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Introduction: This lab was designed to help students understand more about diffraction, as well as teaching them about the wave theory of light, as well as teaching students about phenomena with light, such as single slit, double slit, and other diffraction patterns. Theory: Section 1.1: The idea of this section is that when you have light coming out of a slit, it travels a distance that changes with height from which it left the slit, as in the diagram included, here the light at the top travels a distance that is longer by s sin(theta) where s is the distance vertically between the bottom light ray and the light ray being examined. This separation of distances makes the light out of phase with itself as by the equation Φ=(2πs(sin(θ))/λ. The condition for a maximum by this theory is b sin α = (k + ½) λ, where k is any integer, and the minimums are given by the equation b sin α = k λ. This equation is actually inherently flawed, while a maximum would be expected at 3pi (not at pi, because of interference), the actual maximum is at 8.94, so these equations are only accurate to within 5%. Question: I was taught that when looking at the wave theory of light and sound, you could consider the light to be similar to that of a wave when you drop a rock into a pool of still water. The water will ripple outwards and the expansion could be seen as a combination of the same type of pulses that started the first wave, each occurring instantaneously around the edge of the previous wave, as depicted in my drawing to the right. When the rays are not parallel, I imagine that you would use this same model, but on a slightly different axis, as in this drawing below the previous one. This also is demonstrated in my drawing below, showing the equivalent in kind of a ray format where the rays shown are the maximums. This is to say that when you judge distances you must account for the fact that there is an inherent angle to begin with, so you would need to measure theta from the axis of the slit, not from the perpendicular to which the ray had been traveling.
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Section 1.2:
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This note was uploaded on 11/12/2010 for the course PHYSICS 318017201 taught by Professor Carter during the Spring '10 term at UCLA.

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4bl-lab-8 - Ross Miller 503290136 Lab 8 Diffraction...

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