anatomy and physiology + pix 00-13-49

anatomy and physiology + pix 00-13-49 - About GBMC Map...

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Home > Services > Additional Services > Voice Center > Anatomy and Physiology About GBMC Donate Voice Center Home Request an Appointment - Voice Center Anatomy and Physiology Laryngeal Cancer and Tumor Laryngeal Electromyography (LEMG) Reflux Changes to the Larynx Research and Resources Laryngeal Stroboscopy Care of Your Speaking Voice Vocal Warm-Up Vocal Self-Screening Tips for Professional Voice Users and Singers Voice Screenings Vocal Pathology Image Library Voice Disorders Services Offered Stroboscopy Grand Rounds Foreign Accent Modification Pediatric Speech-Language Pathology Service Upcoming Conferences National Referral Database Video Library Job Opportunities Voice production is a complex action, and involves practically all systems of the body. Voice production begins with respiration (breathing). Air is inhaled as the diaphragm (the large, horizontal muscle below the lungs) lowers. The volume of the lungs expands and air rushes in to fill this space. We exhale as the muscles of the rib cage lower and the diaphragm raises, essentially squeezing the air out. In order to produce sound, adductor muscles (the "vocal cord closers") are activated, providing resistance to exhaled air from the lungs. Air then bursts through the closed vocal cords. As the air rushes through the vocal cords, the pressure between the cords drops, sucking them back together. This is known as the "Bernoulli Effect." This vibration, or the action of the vocal cords being
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anatomy and physiology + pix 00-13-49 - About GBMC Map...

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