Lec-22-Chap-10-2P

Lec-22-Chap-10-2P - The Behavior of Ideal Gases Any...

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The Behavior of Ideal Gases Any equation relating V , P , T and n is a gas law gas law . Most gases at room T and P are ideal ideal ; they follow a simple set of gas laws. Volume, V (mL) 0 100 200 300 400 500 0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 1/Pressure, 1/ P (atm -1 ) V 1/P so: 0 1.0 2.0 3.0 4.0 5.0 Pressure, P (atm) V = constant / P or PV = constant or P 1 V 1 = P 2 V 2 ( T and n must be held constant) Volume varies inversely with pressure. Boyle’s Law
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Boyle’s Law: Pressure-volume relationship For a given gas at the same kinetic energy (T): Smaller volume Æ more collisions Æ increased pressure
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Charles’s Law less obvious (P and n must be held constant) -300 -200 -100 0 100 200 300 Temperature (°C) Gas Volume (mL) 10 20 30 40 50 Hydrogen (H 2 ) Oxygen (O 2 ) Absolute zero -273.15°C V T or = constant or = V 1 V 2 T 1 T 2 V T All gases intersect the T -axis at the same point. V is proportional to T V is directly proportional to absolute absolute T Charles’s Law
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Absolute Temperature 0 K = “absolute zero”. The degree Celsius and kelvin “steps” are equally sized. The zeros are different.
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This note was uploaded on 11/14/2010 for the course CHE 131 taught by Professor Kerber during the Spring '08 term at SUNY Stony Brook.

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Lec-22-Chap-10-2P - The Behavior of Ideal Gases Any...

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