Ch3-_Wood_and_Wood_Products

Ch3-_Wood_and_Wood_Products - Chapter 3 Wood & Wood...

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Chapter 3 Fundamentals of Building Construction, Materials & Methods, 5 th Edition Copyright © 2009 J. Iano. All rights reserved.
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T REES
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Tree Growth Bark: Outermost protective layer (A: dead, B: living) Cambium layer (C): Source of new wood cells Sapwood (D): Living cells that store and transport nutrients Heartwood (E): Dead cells that contribute to structural strength Pith (F): Innermost, first year’s growth Annual growth rings: Result from differences in rate of tree growth and density of cells, from spring to summer
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Softwoods From cone-bearing (coniferous) trees Relatively simple cell structure Generally, plain figure (pattern of grain and surface features) (top: pine; bottom: fir)
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Softwoods Mostly originating from North American forests Fast-growing, plentiful, relatively inexpensive Generally soft, easily worked Uses: structural wood products finish trim, shingles and siding flooring But not all softwoods are soft. For example, Douglas Fir is harder than some hardwoods.
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Hardwoods From broadleafed (deciduous) trees More complex cell structure Often more interesting figure (top: walnut, with readily apparent pores; bottom: red oak, with pores and rays)
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Hardwoods Harvested from around the world Slower growing, generally more expensive than softwoods Denser, with greater variety of colors and figure fine trim, paneling flooring fine cabinet work, furniture
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Certified Wood Sustainable forestry management Protect forest ecosystem Maintain long term forest economic viability Some programs also address social responsibilities, for example, the land rights of indigenous peoples.
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Certified Wood Forest Stewardship Council (FSC): Only certifying organization currently recognized for LEED certification
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L UMBER
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Sawing Plainsawn : growth rings roughly parallel to wider face of board ( right ) Quartersawn : growth rings close to perpendicular to wider face of board ( left )
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Plainsawn lumber Broader grain pattern on wide face Greater distortion during drying More uneven surface erosion or wear More efficiently sawn from log; less costly Also called flatsawn, flat grain (left: red oak; right: white oak)
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Quartersawn lumber More narrowly spaced grain pattern on wide face Less distortion during drying More even surface erosion or wear More costly to saw from log Riftsawn (left): angle of grain falls between perfectly quarter sawn and plainsawn Also called edge sawn, edge grain, vertical grain
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This note was uploaded on 11/14/2010 for the course CM 2121 taught by Professor Spring during the Fall '08 term at LSU.

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Ch3-_Wood_and_Wood_Products - Chapter 3 Wood & Wood...

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