d6b8ad8c1c9b899ace112ba391552842

d6b8ad8c1c9b899ace112ba391552842 - ECON2030 1) 16:47...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
ECON 2030 16:47 1) The Basics a) Economies and economics i) Definitions (focus more on applications and examples) (1) Economics: the study of how societies provision themselves with the  material means of existence, including objects needed, services  needed, anything that you can purchase. Can be a function of time.  ii) What? How? For whom? Consequences?  (1) These are the four questions that will be answered this semester.  (2) What material means of existence will our society provision itself with? (3) How are we going to go about provisioning ourselves with these  things? (4) Who will get those provisions?  (5) These questions are answered based on the markets.  iii) Markets (1) Refers to a set of social behaviours.  iv) Microeconomics (1) Individual cases, small markets v) Macroeconomics (1) The big picture, the total amount of jobs in the country, the  2) Economic reasoning a) Opportunity cost and scarcity i) Everything we do involves cost, be it monetary or non monetary, in terms  of time, effort, happiness, ect. by going to class you give up the  opportunity to do anything else.  b) The margin
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
c) Rationality Wednesday 26 august 2009 1) Business a) Practice problems i) Chapter 1 (1) 1-5, 8, 11, 12, 15, 16, 18-20, 25-28 ii) chapter 2 (1) 3-5, 7, 9, 10, 14-16, 18 b) check in for new arrivals 2) SUBSTANCE a) Economic reasoning i) Opportunity cost - the loss  of potential gain from other alternatives when  one alternative is chosen ii) The margin – the limit, the edge. Small incremental decisions, should I  take 12 or 15 hours? iii) Rationality – using what we know to make what we hope is the best choice b) Examples of economic reasoning i) Bibi the tutor, parts 1 and 2     . Bibi buys tickets to concert but forgets,  concert is same time as tutoring session. Has two choices: tutor for 60  bucks; benefit of concert: perceived pleasure, she cant know if its going to  be awesome. Rationale: if 60$ is worth more to her than the perceived  cost, she will tutor. If the perceived pleasure is worth more than 60 dollars,  she will go to the concert.  (1) Relevant costs  (2) Sunk costs – the cost of the ticket, it is a cost that is already gone, it is  not used in the decision.  ii) Stasia and the smorgasbord;      poor starving grad students see cheep  buffet, wonder at the marginal costs. 16$ to get in, which means 16 for the  first bite, and 0 for every bite thereafter. In marginal costs you ignore all  previous costs and focus on what’s in front of you.  (1) Relevant costs
Background image of page 2
(2) Sunk costs iii) Moodle example (1) Relevant costs iv) Positive vs. normative economics (1) A positive statement is a descriptive statement, it is testable. Positive 
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 11/14/2010 for the course ECON 2030 taught by Professor Bong during the Spring '07 term at LSU.

Page1 / 14

d6b8ad8c1c9b899ace112ba391552842 - ECON2030 1) 16:47...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online