Research Paper Com 220(3) - Friend or Foe: Aggressive...

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Friend or Foe: Aggressive Behavior in Dogs 1 Friend or Foe: Aggressive Behavior in Dogs Cathy Bandelow Research Writing/Com 220 June 6, 2010 Will Tyler
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Friend or Foe: Aggressive Behavior in Dogs 2 Canine behaviorists define aggression in dogs as an intention to harm. Barking, biting, chewing, and lunging are forms of aggressive behavior that a majority of dogs are prone. Problems not only arise to a dog’s owner but also to anyone who associates with a dog. Present- day domesticated dogs have wild instincts in their bloodlines. Every dog has teeth with the ability to inflict harm. Every breed of dogs is dangerous at different levels. Even though particular breeds of dogs have the reputation of being aggressive, successful rehabilitation with proper re-training and positive re-enforcement plays a key role. Figure 1. Aggressive Behavior. iStockphoto/Yuny Relenekyy Note: From Science Daily (February 18, 2008) Aggression in all breeds of dogs is common, but more common in some breeds that are predisposed to display this type of behavior. The breed standard or guidelines, established by well-known national and international kennel clubs, dictates if aggression is common and to what extent is allowed. The intensity of aggression differs for each individual dog and may not be displayed as the breed standard suggests. Throughout history, specific breeds have had a purpose or a function; herding, hunting, and protection, to name a few. Breeds with an aggressive reputation are simply carrying out their function. Aggressive behavior in dogs is commonplace. Every dog is wired to protect its territory. Some are wired incorrectly, and the aggression escalates.
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Friend or Foe: Aggressive Behavior in Dogs 3 Chemical imbalances, genetics, hormones, and illness are medical causes for aggressive behavior. Dogs do suffer from humanlike ailments. Older dogs may become confused and insecure, similar to senility, which may trigger aggressive behavior. Medication and diet may modify mood and increase the chances of aggression. A veterinarian’s professional opinion determines if medical reasons are the source of aggression. Humane societies and animal shelters use tests to rule out medical causes. Sue Sternburg developed a method of testing temperament testing of dogs. Sue has more than 25 years experience studying dog behavior. Sue Sternburg is nationally and internationally known for working with animals as a behavior counselor and an animal care technician. The temperament evaluation process is 15 minutes and requires specialized training. The process is Assess-a-Pet. Staff members or behaviorists interact with the dog to assess the probability of biting. They observe how the dog responds to visitors and other animals. This test is performed on dogs for adoptability. Without this test in place, aggressive animals are subjected to immediate euthanization. Opponents to the method include animal welfare volunteers and shelter workers. The decision to euthanize an animal that has potential for rehabilitation is an escape or
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Research Paper Com 220(3) - Friend or Foe: Aggressive...

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