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Chapter11 - Chemistry in Focus 3rd edition Tro Chapter 11...

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Chemistry in Focus 3rd edition Tro Chapter 11 The Air Around Us
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Air Bags Impact trips a sensor that activates the reaction: The gaseous product of the reaction occupies 450 times more space than does the solid reactant.
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Pressure Defined Gas molecules are in constant motion, colliding with each other and with the walls of their container. The sum of these collisions is called pressure.
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A Swarm of Particles The air around us, a swarm of molecules not unlike a swarm of gnats, is tasteless, odorless, and invisible; yet we can feel its effects, and we depend on it every moment of our existence.
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Pressure Pressure is directly proportional to the number of gas molecules in the air; pressure can change.
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Units of Pressure: Force per Unit Area
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The pressure principle at work in a barometer allows us to drink through a straw. The heights of liquids in a barometer tube depend on what the liquid is. For convenience, more dense substances (like mercury) are common.
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Pressure and Weather High atmospheric pressure redirects storms (sign of fair weather). Low atmospheric pressure tends to draw storms in (sign of rainy weather). Changes in pressure are responsible for wind.
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Gas Property Relationships Fundamental properties of gases: Pressure Amount (measured in moles, represented by n) Volume (usually expressed in liters) Temperature (expressed in Kelvins) If one of these properties is changed, the others will also change.
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Boyle’s Law
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