Ch_7-3_Simple_QM

Ch_7-3_Simple_QM - Quantum Mechanics Where did it come...

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Quantum Mechanics Where did it come form? It may look like pulling a rabbit out of a hat . . .but it is not.
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Quantum mechanics was developed to understand the properties of atoms and molecules. In quantum mechanics physicists use the wave properties of matter to understand atoms. The main equation is called the Schrödinger equation Scientists understood waves ( ). Scientists understood particles could behave like waves ( λ = h/p ). Schrödinger combined these two equations to develop the Schrödinger equation. 2 2 2 2 () dy yx dx π λ ⎛⎞ =− ⎜⎟ ⎝⎠ 2 s i n ( ) x A = To understand QM, you need to understand standing waves.
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STANDING WAVES Plucking a guitar string is an example of a standing wave. Because the ends of the string are fixed, only certain wavelengths are allowed. The longest wavelength occurs when the string is plucked in the middle. In this case the wavelength is twice the length of the string.
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This note was uploaded on 11/14/2010 for the course CHEM 230 taught by Professor Desilva during the Spring '08 term at Montclair.

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Ch_7-3_Simple_QM - Quantum Mechanics Where did it come...

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