s415.syllabus.fa10 - SOCIOLOGY 415: Technology and Society...

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Unformatted text preview: SOCIOLOGY 415: Technology and Society University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, Fall 2010 Lecture Posted: Course Dates: Course No.: Online System: COURSE SYLLABUS M 6:00 pm Instructor: Quincy Edwards 08/23 - 12/17/10 Office hours: TBA 1164 Office location: TBA Laulima Email: quincy.edwards@hawaii.edu Web: http://www2.hawaii.edu/~qedwards/ https://laulima.hawaii.edu/ 1. Classmate contact information: 2. Classmate contact information: Name: _________________________ Name: _________________________ email: _________________________ email: _________________________ Tel.: Tel.: _________________________ _________________________ CONTENTS OF THIS SYLLABUS: SUBJECT PAGE Course location and contact information......................................................... UH catalog course description ........................................................................ Introduction ................................................................................................ Instructor’s advice to students....................................................................... Measurable student learning outcomes ........................................................... Course requirements .................................................................................... Textbook ........................................................................................... Course reader .................................................................................... Online system .................................................................................... Attendance policy ........................................................................................ Course design ............................................................................................. Class discussions and critical readings ................................................... Quizzes ............................................................................................. Primary research & writing assignment .................................................. Proposal ....................................................................................... Research paper ............................................................................. Grading policy .................................................................................... Course grading criteria ........................................................................ Method of evaluation: Grading policy .................................................................................... Course grading criteria ........................................................................ General instructions for preparing assignments ................................................ Presentation Style............................................................................... Organization ...................................................................................... Content ............................................................................................. KOKUA for students with disabilities ............................................................... Schedule of reading assignments and examinations .......................................... Course calendar .......................................................................................... Disclaimer .................................................................................................. Important registration and withdrawal deadline information ............................... Important note concerning student conduct ..................................................... Revised Student Conduct Code (July 2009) ............................................. Online eCAFE evaluation process.................................................................... Student suggestion and question form ............................................................ Page 1 of 11 1 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 6 7 9 9 9 10 11 11 SOCIOLOGY 415: Technology and Society University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, Fall 2010 UH CATALOG COURSE DESCRIPTION SOC 415 Technology and Society (3) Nature of technology, social forces that affect its adoption; impact on society; innovation.DS INTRODUCTION In this course, attention will be given to different aspects of the relationship between technology and society and directions for the future. The nature of technology and the process of innovation are driven by social influences and pressures. Those social influences mean that technologies reflect and often reinforce the structures of social, economic, and political power in any society. Students will examine the way in which technology is affected at a fundamental level by the social contexts in which it develops, challenging the common view that technological change follows its own logic of progress, independent of human actors. They will develop critical thinking skills to understand how technology is shaped by social factors and how technology contributes to shaping society by examining various case studies. INSTRUCTOR’S ADVICE TO STUDENTS This syllabus is different from many others. It is longer than some, more detailed than most. But most importantly, it is designed to help you successfully pass the course. Please keep this syllabus for reference during the course. In the following pages, there are many suggestions to you but the most crucial one is this: Get help as soon as you think you need it. Do not create an insurmountable “catch-up” problem for yourself. If you are seriously in need of help, make an appointment to meet with me. Because this course is somewhat concentrated and the learning process is a cumulative one, it is imperative that students do not fall behind and, to this end, the following practices will be adopted: 1. Each assignment will be graded and individual feedback provided. 2. After each examination, each student will be provided with an individual grading sheet that explains any deduction of points. Students are encouraged to contact me to discuss their progress. 3. If you would like an appointment to meet with me on campus, arrangements can be made via email. 4. You may also communicate by means of the suggestion form included at the end of the syllabus. Make a suggestion, bring about a complaint, or just remind me of something…. Most importantly, take ownership of your education in this class by completing all reading and writing assignments on time and participating in online discussions. MEASURABLE STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES The goals of this course are for students, using both theory and contemporary application, to: 1. Explore, within historical and contemporary contexts, the societal implications of technology. 2. Identify the social forces that affect the adoption of technology and innovation. 3. Consider the public policy implications of innovation. 4. Recognize the changing nature of technology and its impact on society. Page 2 of 11 SOCIOLOGY 415: Technology and Society University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, Fall 2010 To accomplish such goals, a combination of lectures, readings, discussions, and writings will be employed. Lectures and readings will focus on the introduction of new material; discussions and writings will assist in comprehension of the material. COURSE REQUIREMENTS Textbook: Volti, Rudi. 2009. Society and Technological Change. 6th edition. Worth Publishers Inc. Title: Society and Technological Change Edition: 6 Hardcover: 332 pages Publisher: Worth Publishers Inc. (March 6, 2009) Language: English ISBN-10: 1429221216 ISBN-13: 978-1429221214 Product Dimensions: 8.8 x 6 x 1.2 inches Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds List price: $38.63 UH Bookstore: Amazon: Barnes & Noble: Borders: CourseSmart.com eCampus: TBA $38.63 $56.75 (Members, $51.07) $60.80 $27.95 (180-day eBook) $54.60 (eBook, $33.54) Course reader: A set of supplemental readings will be provided. Online system: Laulima is the University of Hawai‘i course management system. Links to the discussion board and other salient features will be provided thereon. ATTENDANCE POLICY This is an online asynchronous course. Your active participation constitutes your attendance. While attendance is not explicitly used in the calculation of your overall course grade, I am required to report excessive absences – or in this case, non-participation – to your academic dean. The matter is then left to the dean’s discretion. Having explained the attendance policy, please know that research has shown — and my experience confirms — that absenteeism is correlated with lower grades. This is especially true of this course as the knowledge is cumulative with each step building on the previous step. Inconsistent attendance creates insurmountable “catch-up” problems for students. In other words, absenteeism is counter-productive to your academic objectives and strongly discouraged. However, this course will come easily to anyone who keeps up with the assignments and gets help when needed. COURSE DESIGN Class discussions & critical readings: Weekly online class discussions are based on students’ reflections on reading assignments, current events, and other relevant topics. These will require some thought and possibly some research, so it is unwise to wait until the due date to post your comments. Regular, timely and meaningful participation is a key factor in your grade. Please note that late assignments will not be accepted by the Laulima system. Page 3 of 11 SOCIOLOGY 415: Technology and Society University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, Fall 2010 Quizzes (5) Five short quizzes will be administered during the course. Each of these quizzes will relate to the current readings and materials discussed, and may include multiple choice, true/false, matching, yes/no, fill-in-the-blank, numeric response, essay, and/or multiple response question types. WARNING: Do NOT miss a quiz! There are no make-up quizzes. Research & Writing Assignment Each student will provide an analysis and a critical evaluation of an area of inquiry on a topic agreed to by the student and instructor. This assignment will culminate in a five- to eightpage final research paper with the expectation that it will reflect improvement based on the instructor’s critique of the student’s draft. PROPOSAL A one-page proposal is to be submitted to the instructor by the date specified in the Schedule of Reading Assignments and Examinations. The proposal must evidence improvement over the draft. Proposals will not be accepted without previous submission of the proposal draft and instructor’s subsequent comments. RESEARCH PAPER This is a five- to eight-page final research paper (on the topic previously agreed to by the student and instructor) that must evidence improvement over the draft. Final papers will not be accepted without previous submission of the research paper draft and the instructor’s subsequent comments. WARNING: Do NOT miss any due dates! All requirements must be met as scheduled. This online course allows you the freedom to selfdirect your work within extended timeframes; as a result, there will be no makeup postings or exams. Additionally, there will be no “incompletes” given as already you will have worked on a complete draft. METHOD OF EVALUATION: Assignments, Examinations and the Course Grading Criteria Grading Policy: The overall grading structure of the course consists of: Class discussions & critical readings 20% Quizzes (5 x 10%) 50% Proposal 05% Research paper 25% Course Grading Criteria: This course employs a criterion grading system. Therefore, theoretically, everyone in the class could earn an “A”. This helps to prevent students from being penalized in the event that one or two students do exceptionally well. To assure a specific grade, consider the following scale: 98-100% = A+ 87-89% = B+ 77-79% = C+ 67-69% = D+ 94-97% =A 83-86% = B 73-76% = C 63-66% = D 90-93% = A- 80-82% = B- 70-72% = C- 60-62% = D- Page 4 of 11 SOCIOLOGY 415: Technology and Society University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, Fall 2010 GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS FOR PREPARING ASSIGNMENTS Quality and clarity of content presented are grading criteria. All answers must be given in context and neatness counts. Written assignments are to be typed in 10-point Arial or 11-point Times New Roman fonts, double-spaced, with all margins set at one inch and no additional spacing between paragraphs. The grade for a paper will be based on: 1. Presentation Style (a) Grammar (e.g., sentence structure, noun-verb agreement, consistent verb tense). (b) Spelling and punctuation. (c) Correct citation (e.g., APA, Chicago, or MLA style). Each citation must be the result of an in-text reference with page number. (d) Except for the title page, all pages are to be numbered consecutively at the top right-hand margin. 2. Organization (a) Structure and format. (b) Logical sequencing and continuity of ideas. (c) Clarity of expression. (d) Conciseness. 3. Content As indicated by specific paper assignment. NOTE: Citation Guides and Style Manuals are available at: http://library.manoa.hawaii.edu/research/tools/writing.html#style KOKUA FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES Any students who feel they may need an accommodation based on the impact of a disability are invited to contact me privately. I will be happy to work with you and the KOKUA Program (Office for Students with Disabilities) to ensure reasonable accommodations in my course. KOKUA may be reached at: Queen Lili‘uokalani Center for Student Services 013 2600 Campus Road, Honolulu, HI 96822 Tel.: Hours: Monday-Friday, 7:45am-4:30pm Website: http://www.hawaii.edu/kokua/ Fax: Email: (808) 956-7511 or (808) 956-7612 (Voice/Text) (808) 956-8093 kokua@hawaii.edu The KOKUA Program — Kahi O Ka Ulu‘Ana (“The Place of Growing”) — is the primary campus unit responsible for providing academic access services to students with disabilities toward equal opportunity. Creating equal access is a shared responsibility of students, faculty, KOKUA, and the entire campus community. KOKUA is administratively situated in the Office of Student Equity, Excellence, & Diversity within the Division of Student Affairs. Page 5 of 11 SOCIOLOGY 415: Technology and Society University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, Fall 2010 SCHEDULE OF READING ASSIGNMENTS AND EXAMINATIONS (FALL 2010) ASSIGNMENT CHAPTER WEEK NO. DATE Chapter 1 The Nature of Technology 1 08/23/10 Chapter 2 Winners and Losers: The Differential Effects … 2 08/30/10 Chapter 3 The Sources of Technological Change 3 09/06/10 4 09/13/10 5 09/20/10 QUICK QUIZ #1 Chapter 4 Scientific Knowledge and Technological Advance Chapter 5 The Diffusion of Technology Critical Reading #1 Chapter 6 Technology, Energy, and the Environment QUICK QUIZ #2 Chapter 7 Medical and Biological Technologies 6 09/27/10 Chapter 8 Genetic Technologies 7 10/04/10 8 10/11/10 Critical Reading #2 Chapter 9 Work in Non-industrial Societies QUICK QUIZ #3 ONE-PAGE PROPOSAL DUE BEFORE 12 NOON ON 10/18/10. Chapter 10 Technology and Jobs: More of One and Less of … 9 10/18/10 Chapter 11 Technological Change and Life on the Job 10 10/25/10 Chapter 12 Printing 11 11/01/10 Critical Reading #3 QUICK QUIZ #4 Chapter 13 The Electronic Media 12 11/08/10 Chapter 14 Weapons and Their Consequences 13 11/15/10 Chapter 15 How New Weapons Emerge … 14 11/22/10 15 11/29/10 16 12/06/10 QUICK QUIZ #5 Chapter 16 Technology and Its Creators: Who’s in Charge … Critical Reading #4 Chapter 17 Organizations and Technological Change Chapter 18 Governing Technology FINAL EXAMINATION RESEARCH PAPER DUE BEFORE 12 NOON ON 12/17/10 ADHERENCE TO ALL DUE DATES IS IMPERATIVE. EXTENSIONS WILL NOT BE GIVEN. Page 6 of 11 SOCIOLOGY 415: Technology and Society University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, Fall 2010 COURSE CALENDAR (Fall 2010) Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat August 8 2010 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 23 24 25 26 27 28 30 31 22 29 September Sun 1st Class Meeting Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri 1 5 6 LABOR DAY 7 2 3 4 8 9 10 11 Quiz #1 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 28 29 30 Quiz #2 2010 Sat 26 27 Page 7 of 11 SOCIOLOGY 415: Technology and Society University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, Fall 2010 Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 1 2 2010 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 October 3 11 12 13 14 15 16 19 20 21 22 23 26 27 28 29 30 Quiz #3 17 18 1-Page Proposal Due 24 25 31 Sun Mon Tue 1 November Quiz #4 7 2 Thu Fri Sat 3 4 5 6 10 11 12 13 GENERAL ELECTION DAY 9 VETERANS DAY 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 Quiz #5 28 2010 8 Wed 29 THANKSGIVING 30 Page 8 of 11 INSTRUC. HOLIDAY SOCIOLOGY 415: Technology and Society University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, Fall 2010 December Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 1 5 12 6 13 Final Exams 14 Final Exams 3 4 8 7 2 9 10 11 15 Final Exams 16 Final Exams 17 Final Exam Research Paper Due 18 END OF FALL SEMESTER Disclaimer: If circumstances change, the instructor reserves the right to alter, modify, amend, or otherwise change the syllabus. No changes are anticipated at this time, but if changes do become necessary, students will be notified in writing. IMPORTANT REGISTRATION AND WITHDRAWAL DEADLINE INFORMATION 08/30/2010 Last day to drop classes (No "W" on transcript). 09/01/2010 Last day to register/add courses. Last day for 100% tuition refund. 09/13/2010 Last day to receive 50% tuition refund. 10/22/2010 Last day to withdraw from class ("W" on transcript). IMPORTANT NOTE CONCERNING STUDENT CONDUCT Students are required to abide by the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa Student Conduct Code. Note that “the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa exists for the pursuit of knowledge through teaching, learning, and research conducted in an atmosphere of physical and intellectual freedom. Moreover, members of the UH academic community are committed to engage in teaching, learning, research, and community service and to assist one another in the creation and maintenance of an environment which supports these activities. It is therefore the policy of the University that members of the academic community may not violate the rights of one another nor disrupt the basic activities of the institution (as provided in section 1-4, chapter 1 of the Board of Regents' Bylaws and Policies [Part D]). Students who are disruptive are, consequently, subject to a variety of academically related penalties which may include reprimand, probation, restitution, suspension or expulsion.” (http://www.manoa.hawaii.edu/students/conduct/). Furthermore, recognize that the code prohibits all forms of scholastic dishonesty, including cheating, plagiarism, and falsification or misrepresentation of experimental data. The code covers all written and oral examinations, term papers, creative works, assigned computer related work, and any other academic work done at the University of Hawai‘i. Any violation of the student code will be reported. Any further questions regarding the Conduct Code should be addressed to the Office of the Dean of Students, Bachman Annex 10, phone V/T (808) 956-3290. Page 9 of 11 SOCIOLOGY 415: Technology and Society University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, Fall 2010 Revised Student Conduct Code (July 2009) There is a change in the Student Conduct Code that has been adopted by the Board of Regents. The new Student Conduct Code became effective in July 2009. It comes in two parts. The revised system-wide part is available at: http://www.hawaii.edu/apis/ep/e7/e7208.pdf. The Mānoa part is available at: http://studentaffairs.manoa.hawaii.edu/downloads/conduct_code/UHM_Student_Conduct_C ode.pdf "The following are examples of the types of behavior that conflict with the community standards that the UH values and expects of students. Engaging in, or attempting to engage in any of these behaviors subjects a student to the disciplinary process and sanctions on each campus: 1. Acts of dishonesty, including but not limited to the following: a. Cheating, plagiarism, or other forms of academic dishonesty. b. Furnishing false information to any UH official, faculty member, or office. c. Forgery, alteration, or misuse of any UH document, record, or form of identification. The term "cheating" includes, but is not limited to: (i) The use of any unauthorized assistance in taking quizzes, tests, or examinations; (ii) The use of sources beyond those authorized by the instructor in writing papers, preparing reports, solving problems, or carrying out other assignments; (iii) The acquisition, without permission, of tests or other academic material belonging to a member of the UH faculty, staff or student (iv) Engaging in any behavior specifically prohibited by a faculty member in the course syllabus or class discussion. The term "plagiarism" includes, but is not limited to: (i) The use, by paraphrase or direct quotation, of the published or unpublished work of another person without full and clear acknowledgement. (ii) The unacknowledged use of materials prepared by another person or agency engaged in the selling of term papers or other academic materials." [E7.208 UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII SYSTEMWIDE STUDENT CONDUCT CODE, July 2009] ONLINE eCAFE EVALUATION PROCESS The Department of Sociology is committed to attaining continual improvement in the quality of its course offerings. For this reason, your assistance is much-needed as you progress with your education. As students (and course consumers), only you are able to tell us about your educational experiences in your classes, and you are encouraged to do so through our evaluation process. Toward the end of each semester, you will be informed of the time period during which the online eCAFE system will be available for submission of course evaluations by logging in to http://www.hawaii.edu/ecafe/. To assure the openness of the evaluation process and the availability of submitted information to incoming students, current students, the Department, and other interested parties, the results of the evaluations will be accessible at http://www.hawaii.edu/ecafe/. By participating in this process, you are assuring that UH will continue to improve its course offerings and available resources for students. Page 10 of 11 SOCIOLOGY 415: Technology and Society University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, Fall 2010 STUDENT SUGGESTION AND QUESTION FORM This form may be completed at any time during the course and sent to me electronically or deposited in my mailbox located in Saunders 247. I HAVE THE FOLLOWING SUGGESTION/QUESTION: PLEASE ANSWER ME (CHECK ONE): In class (if time permits). Through my email at: _________________________ No answer is required. NAME (optional): _____________________________________ Page 11 of 11 ...
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This note was uploaded on 11/15/2010 for the course SOC 415 taught by Professor Swift,d during the Fall '08 term at University of Hawaii, Manoa.

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