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Unformatted text preview: SOCIOLOGY 313: Survey of Sociology of Work University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, Fall 2010 COURSE SYLLABUS Lecture Posted: Course Dates: Course No.: Online System: M 6:00pm 08/23 - 12/17/10 TBA Laulima https://laulima.hawaii.edu/ 1. Classmate contact information: Instructor: Quincy Edwards Office hours: TBA Office location: TBA Email: quincy.edwards@hawaii.edu Web: http://www2.hawaii.edu/~qedwards/ 2. Classmate contact information: Name: _________________________ Name: _________________________ email: _________________________ email: _________________________ Tel.: Tel.: _________________________ _________________________ CONTENTS OF THIS SYLLABUS: Subject Page Course and contact information .................................................................... 1 UH catalog course description ....................................................................... 2 Introduction ............................................................................................... 2 Instructor’s advice to students...................................................................... 2 Learning objectives ..................................................................................... 3 Course Requirements .................................................................................. 3 Textbook .......................................................................................... 3 Course Reader................................................................................... 3 Materials on reserve ........................................................................... 3 Online system ................................................................................... 3 Attendance policy ....................................................................................... 4 Method of evaluation: Classroom discussions/critical readings ................................................. 4 Quizzes ............................................................................................ 4 Activities .......................................................................................... 4 Examinations .................................................................................... 4 Course grading criteria ....................................................................... 5 General instructions for preparing assignments ............................................... 5 KOKUA for students with disabilities .............................................................. 6 Important note concerning student conduct .................................................... 6 Course schedule of assignments and examinations .......................................... 7 Course calendar ......................................................................................... 8 Disclaimer ................................................................................................. 10 Important registration and withdrawal deadline information .............................. 10 Student suggestion and question form ........................................................... 11 Page 1 of 11 SOCIOLOGY 313: Survey of Sociology of Work University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, Fall 2010 UH CATALOG COURSE DESCRIPTION SOC 313 Survey of Sociology of Work (3) Work from viewpoint of individuals; meaningfulness versus productivity; how work, economics, and the industrial system affect individual goals. Pre: 100 or any 200-level SOC course or junior standing, or consent. DS INTRODUCTION Work is a dynamic field and its sociological aspects are forever in flux. In this course, we will focus on the historical and macro-sociological aspects of such changes as well as the different types of labor and their interrelationships. Topics include: occupations and professions, industries and technologies, along with the influences of organizations, social institutions, and social policies in contemporary society. Future trends in the workplace will also be discussed and we will speculate on how new entities might replace traditional ones in ways not yet envisaged. In a personal context, we may view work with anguish or optimism for it is a significant part of who we are and what we do. While work provides financial opportunity, it also shapes one’s identity, produces meaning, and creates social prestige. A developing global system is absorbing national economies. On both national and global levels, the ongoing transformations in the social organization of work have resulted in a highly competitive arena, creating pressures on worker performance and productivity. As technologies advance in application and research, organizations become more flexible and in order to accommodate the fluctuations of industry needs, employers choose alternatives to permanent work forces by replacing them with temporary or part-time personnel. It follows that these practices present major challenges to workers and have profound implications on their career planning and job security. The way in which we meet these challenges will reshape the economic, political, and social policies of the 21st century. INSTRUCTOR’S ADVICE TO STUDENTS This syllabus is different from many others. It is longer than some, more detailed than most. But most importantly, it is designed to help you successfully pass the course. Please keep this syllabus for reference during the course. In the following pages, there are many suggestions to you but the most crucial one is this: Get help as soon as you think you need it. Do not create an insurmountable “catch-up” problem for yourself. If you are seriously in need of help, make an appointment to meet with me. Because this course is somewhat concentrated and the learning process is a cumulative one, it is imperative that students do not fall behind and, to this end, the following practices will be adopted: 1. Each assignment will be graded and individual feedback provided. 2. After the term examination, each student will be provided with an individual grading sheet that explains any deduction of points. Students are encouraged to contact me to discuss their progress. 3. If you would like an appointment to meet with me on campus, arrangements can be made via email. 4. You may also communicate by means of the suggestion form included at the end of the syllabus. Make a suggestion, bring about a complaint, or just remind me of something…. Most importantly, take ownership of your education in this class by completing all reading and writing assignments on time and participating in online discussions. Page 2 of 11 SOCIOLOGY 313: Survey of Soc iology of Work University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa , Fall 2010 LEARNING OBJECTIVES The goals of this course are for students, using both theory and contemporary application, to: 1. Interpret and translate the major theories w hen studying work from a sociological perspective. d 2. Identify categories, structures, terminology , and trends according to the social organization of work. 3. Recognize the changing nature of work in n ational and global economies. 4. Understand how the nature of work and occ upations shapes everyday life. r 5. Analyze and evaluate some of the major tre nds in work today. 6. Apply ideas and concepts of the sociology o f work to individual work experiences. COURSE REQUIREMENTS Textbook: Hodson, Randy, and Teresa A. Sullivan. 2007. The Soc cial Organization of Work. 4th ed. Belmont: Wadsworth/Thomson Learning. Title : The Social Organization of Work (4th Ed.) Auth ors: Randy Ho dson, Teresa A. Sullivan Pape rback: 528 p ages Publ isher: Wadsw orth Publishing (July 24, 2007) l ISBN -10: 0495003 719 ISBN -13: 9780495 003717 Prod uct Dimensions: 9.1 x 7.4 x 0.7 inches Ship ping Weight: 1.2 pounds p List price: $115.9 5 UH B ookstore: Amaz on: Barne & Noble: es Borde ers: ichap ters.com eCam pus: T BA $ 115.95 $ 115.95 (Members, $104.35) $ 115.95 $ 98.49 (ebook $57.99) $ 101.99 (eVIP, $96.90) Course reader: A set of supplemental readings will be provided. Materials on reserve: A copy of the course textbook will be made available a t Sinclair Library with a three-hour loan period. A copy of the course reader will also be a vailable for a similar loan period. Online system: Laulima is the University of Hawai‘i course manageme nt system. Links to the discussion board and other salient features will be provided there on. Page 3 of 11 SOCIOLOGY 313: Survey of Sociology of Work University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, Fall 2010 ATTENDANCE POLICY This is an online asynchronous course. Your active participation constitutes your attendance. While attendance is not explicitly used in the calculation of your overall course grade, I am required to report excessive absences – or in this case, non-participation – to your academic dean. The matter is then left to the dean’s discretion. Having explained the attendance policy, please know that research has shown — and my experience confirms — that absenteeism is correlated with lower grades. This is especially true of this course as the knowledge is cumulative with each step building on the previous step. Inconsistent attendance creates insurmountable “catch-up” problems for students. In other words, absenteeism is counter-productive to your academic objectives and strongly discouraged. However, this course will come easily to anyone who keeps up with the assignments and gets help when needed. METHOD OF EVALUATION: Assignments, Examinations and the Course Grading Criteria The overall grading structure of the course consists of class discussions/critical readings (20%), quizzes (4 x 5% = 20%), activities (4 x 5% = 20%), a term examination (15%), and a final examination/research paper (25%). Class discussions/critical readings: Class discussions are based on students’ thoughtful reflections on reading assignments and other relevant topics. To receive credit for the assignments, they are to be submitted electronically by a specified time. Please note that late assignments will not be accepted by the Laulima Drop Box. Quizzes: There are four quizzes administered during the course. These consist of multiple choice questions directly related to the textbook reading assignments. Each quiz is to be taken electronically before the close of the week in which it is assigned. Late submissions will not be accepted by the Laulima system. Activities: There are four activities administered during the course. These are designed to reinforce course concepts and to aid in the analysis of your individual work experiences. Examinations: The mid-term examination consists of several short-answer questions that will directly reflect lecture and reading assignments. The final examination consists of an eight-page research paper, on a topic agreed to by the student and instructor, in which the student will provide an analysis and a critical evaluation of an area of inquiry. Submit a half-page proposal to the instructor by the close of week #11 (November 08, 2009 at 12 noon) of the course schedule. WARNING: Do NOT miss a quiz or exam! All must be taken when scheduled. This online course allows you the freedom to self-direct your work within extended timeframes; as a result, there will be no makeup quizzes or exams. Page 4 of 11 SOCIOLOGY 313: Survey of Sociology of Work University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, Fall 2010 Course Grading Criteria: This course employs a criterion grading system. Therefore, theoretically, everyone in the class could earn an “A”. This helps to prevent students from being penalized in the event that one or two students do exceptionally well. To assure a specific grade, consider the following scale: 98-100% = A+ 87-89% = B+ 77-79% = C+ 67-69% = D+ 94-97% =A 83-86% = B 73-76% = C 63-66% = D 90-93% = A- 80-82% = B- 70-72% = C- 60-62% = D- GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS FOR PREPARING ASSIGNMENTS Quality and clarity of content presented are grading criteria. All answers must be given in context and neatness counts. Written assignments are to be typed in 10-point Arial or 11point Times New Roman fonts, double-spaced, with all margins set at one inch. The grade for a paper is based on: 1. Presentation Style (a) Grammar (e.g., sentence structure, noun-verb agreement, consistent verb tense) (b) Spelling and punctuation (c) Correct citation (e.g., APA, Chicago, or MLA style). Each citation must be the result of an in-text reference with page number. (d) Except for the title page, all pages are to be numbered consecutively at the top right-hand margin. 2. Organization (a) Structure and format (b) Logical sequencing and continuity of ideas (c) Clarity of expression (d) Conciseness. 3. Content As indicated by specific paper assignment. NOTE: Citation Guides and Style Manuals are available at: http://library.manoa.hawaii.edu/research/tools/writing.html#style Page 5 of 11 SOCIOLOGY 313: Survey of Sociology of Work University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, Fall 2010 KOKUA FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES Any students who feel they may need an accommodation based on the impact of a disability are invited to contact me privately. I will be happy to work with you and the KOKUA Program (Office for Students with Disabilities) to ensure reasonable accommodations in my course. KOKUA may be reached at: Queen Lili‘uokalani Center for Student Services 013 2600 Campus Road, Honolulu, HI 96822 Hours: Tel.: Fax: Email: Website: Monday-Friday, 7:45am-4:30pm (808) 956-7511 (V/T) or (808) 956-7612 (V/T) (808) 956-8093 kokua@hawaii.edu http://www.hawaii.edu/kokua/ The KOKUA Program — Kahi O Ka Ulu‘Ana (“The Place of Growing”) — is the primary campus unit responsible for providing academic access services to students with disabilities toward equal opportunity. Creating equal access is a shared responsibility of students, faculty, KOKUA, and the entire campus community. KOKUA is administratively situated in the Office of Student Equity, Excellence, & Diversity within the Division of Student Affairs. IMPORTANT NOTE CONCERNING STUDENT CONDUCT Students are required to abide by the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa Student Conduct Code. Note that “the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa exists for the pursuit of knowledge through teaching, learning, and research conducted in an atmosphere of physical and intellectual freedom. Moreover, members of the UH academic community are committed to engage in teaching, learning, research, and community service and to assist one another in the creation and maintenance of an environment which supports these activities. It is therefore the policy of the University that members of the academic community may not violate the rights of one another nor disrupt the basic activities of the institution (as provided in section 1-4, chapter 1 of the Board of Regents' Bylaws and Policies [Part D]). Students who are disruptive are, consequently, subject to a variety of academically related penalties which may include reprimand, probation, restitution, suspension or expulsion” (http://www.manoa.hawaii.edu/students/conduct/). Furthermore, recognize that the code prohibits all forms of scholastic dishonesty, including cheating, plagiarism, and falsification or misrepresentation of experimental data. The code covers all written and oral examinations, term papers, creative works, assigned computer related work, and any other academic work done at the University of Hawai‘i. Any violation of the student code will be reported. Any further questions regarding the Conduct Code should be addressed to the Office of the Dean of Students, Bachman Annex 10, phone V/TT (808) 956-3290. Page 6 of 11 SOCIOLOGY 313: Survey of Sociology of Work University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, Fall 2010 SCHEDULE OF READING ASSIGNMENTS AND EXAMINATIONS ° TOPIC ASSIGNMENT Part I: Foundations Chapter 1 The Evolution of Work Chapter 2 Studying the World of Work Activity #1 The Job Portfolio Part II: The Personal Context of Work Chapter 3 Meaningful Work POSTED 08/23/10 08/30/10 QUIZ #1 DUE BEFORE 12 NOON ON 09/07/09 Class, Race, and Gender Chapter 4 Reader Critical reading and discussion #1: Forthcoming Work and Family Chapter 5 Reader Critical reading and discussion #2: Forthcoming Collective Responses to Work Chapter 6 Activity #2 Music and Alienation Part III: Industries and Technologies 09/06/10 Technology and Organization QUIZ #2 DUE BEFORE 12 NOON ON 10/04/09 From Field, Mine, and Factory Critical reading and discussion #3: Forthcoming The High-Technology Revolution 09/27/10 Chapter 7 Chapter 8 Reader Chapter 9 09/13/10 09/20/10 10/04/10 10/11/10 MID-TERM DUE BEFORE 12 NOON ON 10/18/09 Services Chapter 10 Reader Critical reading and discussion #4: Forthcoming Part IV: Occupations and Professions Professions and Professionals Chapter 11 QUIZ #3 DUE BEFORE 12 NOON ON 11/01/09 Managers Chapter 12 Activity #3 The Job Portfolio – Technological Advances HALF-PAGE PROPOSAL DUE BEFORE 12 NOON ON 11/08/09. Administrative Support and Sales Chapter 13 Reader Critical reading and discussion #5: Forthcoming Marginal Jobs Chapter 14 Reader Critical reading and discussion #6: Forthcoming Part V: Work in the Twenty-first Century Chapter 15 Chapter 16 Activity #4 Chapter 17 The Work of the Large Corporation QUIZ #4 DUE BEFORE 12 NOON ON 11/29/09 Globalization Employment Satisfaction and Job Redesign The Future of Work Course Review FINAL EXAMINATION DUE BEFORE 12 NOON ON 12/17/10 Page 7 of 11 10/18/10 10/25/10 11/01/10 11/08/10 11/15/10 11/22/09 11/29/09 12/06/09 12/13/09 SOCIOLOGY 313: Survey of Sociology of Work University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, Fall 2010 COURSE CALENDAR (FALL 2010) Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat August 8 2010 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 23 24 25 26 27 28 30 31 22 29 September Sun 2010 1st Class Meeting Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 1 5 6 LABOR DAY 7 2 3 4 8 9 10 11 Quiz #1 due 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Oct. 1 Oct. 2 Page 8 of 11 SOCIOLOGY 313: Survey of Sociology of Work University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, Fall 2010 Sun Mon 3 4 Wed Thu Fri Sat 5 6 7 8 9 11 12 13 14 15 16 18 19 20 21 22 23 26 27 28 29 30 Quiz #2 due October 2010 Tue 10 17 Mid-term Due 25 24 31 Sun Mon Tue 1 November Quiz #3 due 2010 7 8 Wed 2 Thu Fri Sat 3 4 5 6 10 11 12 13 GENERAL ELECTION DAY 9 ½ pg. proposal due VETERANS DAY 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 THANKSGIVING 28 29 30 Quiz #4 due Page 9 of 11 INSTRUC. HOLIDAY SOCIOLOGY 313: Survey of Sociology of Work University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, Fall 2010 December Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 1 5 12 6 13 Final Exams 14 Final Exams 3 4 8 7 2 9 10 11 15 Final Exams 16 Final Exams 17 Final Exam Research Paper Due 18 END OF FALL SEMESTER Disclaimer: If circumstances change, the instructor reserves the right to alter, modify, amend, or otherwise change the syllabus. No changes are anticipated at this time, but if changes do become necessary, students will be notified in writing. IMPORTANT REGISTRATION AND WITHDRAWAL DEADLINE INFORMATION 08/30/2010 Last day to drop classes (No "W" on transcript). 09/01/2010 Last day to register/add courses. Last day for 100% tuition refund. 09/13/2010 Last day to receive 50% tuition refund. 10/22/2010 Last day to withdraw from class ("W" on transcript). Page 10 of 11 SOCIOLOGY 313: Survey of Sociology of Work University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, Fall 2010 STUDENT SUGGESTION AND QUESTION FORM This form may be completed (anonymously, if you wish) at any time during the course and emailed to me or deposited in my mailbox at Saunders 247. I HAVE THE FOLLOWING SUGGESTION/QUESTION: PLEASE ANSWER ME (CHECK ONE): On discussion board. Through my email at: _________________________ No answer is required. NAME (optional): _____________________________________ Page 11 of 11 ...
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