Article 1 - DarrenNathan February19th,2006 Summary of...

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Darren Nathan February 19 th , 2006 Summary of Chemistry Article: How can graphite and diamond be so different if they are both composed of pure carbon? May 20, 2002 This article discusses why diamond and graphite are different, even though they are composed of the same element. Both diamond and graphite are made entirely out of carbon. Carbon atoms are arranged in space, however, they are different for the two materials, making them allotropes of carbon. The differing properties of carbon and diamond arise from their distinct crystal structures. In a diamond, the carbon atoms are arranged tetrahedrally. Each carbon atom is attached to four other carbon atoms 1.544 x 10 -10 meter away with a C-C-C bond angle of 109.5 degrees. This explains the diamond's hardness, strength and durability and giving the diamond a higher density than graphite (3.514 grams per cubic centimeter). Because of its tetrahedral structure, diamond also shows a great resistance to compression. The hardness of a crystal is measured on a scale, devised by Friederich Mohs, which ranks
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This note was uploaded on 11/15/2010 for the course CHEE 638 taught by Professor Hampton during the Spring '10 term at MO Southern.

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Article 1 - DarrenNathan February19th,2006 Summary of...

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