Collision theory

Collision theory - Collision theory Collision theory is...

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Collision theory Collision theory is used to explain why rates of reaction differ and why changing the particle size, temperature or concentration of reactants will alter the reaction rate. In chemical reactions the atoms in elements or compounds are separated and recombined in new arrangements. For this to happen the reactants must collide with sufficient energy for bonds to be broken before new ones can form. We change the rate of reaction by changing the number of effective collisions per second. If the collision causes a chemical change it is referred to as a fruitful collision. Theory that explains how chemical reactions take place and why rates of reaction alter. For a reaction to occur the reactant particles must collide. Only a certain fraction of the total collisions cause chemical change; these are called successful collisions. The successful collisions have sufficient energy (activation energy) at the moment of impact to break the existing bonds and form new bonds, resulting in the products of the reaction. Increasing the concentration of the reactants and raising the temperature bring about more
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Collision theory - Collision theory Collision theory is...

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