7CDLM04_201003ActivitySheets

7CDLM04_201003ActivitySheets - Physics 7C Model: Single...

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Physics 7C DLM 04 Overview DLM 04 Model: Single Waves Act 8.1.8 (~60 min) Learning Goals: Solidify understanding of the graphical representation of a wave Solidify understanding of how to move from a graphical representation to an algebraic representation Solidify understanding of the wavefront representation of a wave Model: Superposition of Waves Act 8.2.1 Introduction to Superposition of Waves (~30 min) Learning Goals: Getting the picture of superposition of waves being two waves at the same point at the same time Understanding that the wave displacements add algebraically when waves interfere: y tot (x,t) = y 1 (x,t) + y 2 (x,t) Understanding the various terms and terminology used to express the result of superposition: constructive interference, destructive interference, partial interference Act 8.2.2 Interference with Sound Waves I (~70 min) Learning Goals: To get acquainted with interference effects that occur when superposing sound waves of the same frequency Understand how the total phase difference Φ (x,t) can depend on the fixed phase constant difference Φ alone Understand how the total phase difference Φ (x,t) can depend on the path length difference x alone Connecting the total phase difference Φ (x,t) to constructive and destructive interference
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Physics 7C Activity 8.2.1 DLM04 Introduction to Superposition of Waves When two waves both reach the same location, it turns out that the total displacement of the medium is the sum of the individual displacements that would result from each wave independently: y tot (x,t)= y 1 (x,t)+y 2 (x,t). When two waves combine in this fashion, it is called superposition. There are three specific cases of superposition: 1) The waves meet with equivalent phase. The amplitude of the resultant wave is equal to the sum of the amplitudes of the individual waves, and bigger than either of the individual waves. This is called constructive interference . 2) The waves meet with exactly opposite phase (separated by half a cycle). When the waves meet with opposite phase, the resulting wave is smaller than before; in fact, if the amplitudes of the two waves are equal, than the superposed wave completely vanishes! This is called
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This note was uploaded on 11/15/2010 for the course PHY PHY07C taught by Professor David during the Winter '09 term at UC Davis.

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7CDLM04_201003ActivitySheets - Physics 7C Model: Single...

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