chapter5 - Psychology, Fifth Edition, James S. Nairne...

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Psychology, Fifth Edition, James S. Nairne Chapter 5 Chapter 5 Sensation and Perception
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Psychology, Fifth Edition, James S. Nairne Chapter 5 What’s It For? Building the World of Experience Translating the Message Identifying the Message Components Producing a Stable Interpretation
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Psychology, Fifth Edition, James S. Nairne Chapter 5
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Psychology, Fifth Edition, James S. Nairne Chapter 5 Vision: Learning Goals 1. Explain how light gets translated into the electrochemical language of the brain. 2. Discuss how the basic features of the visual message, such as color, are identified by the brain. 3. Explain how a stable interpretation of visual information is created and why the interpretation process sometimes produces visual illusions.
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Psychology, Fifth Edition, James S. Nairne Chapter 5 Translating the Message Visible light = One part of the spectrum of all electromagnetic energy Three main properties: Wavelength Intensity Purity Enters the eye through the cornea, pupil, and lens
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Psychology, Fifth Edition, James S. Nairne Chapter 5
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Psychology, Fifth Edition, James S. Nairne Chapter 5
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Psychology, Fifth Edition, James S. Nairne Chapter 5 Transduction of Light Light strikes the retina, where light-sensitive cells react to light by creating neural impulses Rods: Sensitive to low light Cones: Sensitive to fine detail, color Concentrated in the fovea Photopigments chemically react to light These break down in bright light, regenerate after time in low light, causing dark adaptation
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Psychology, Fifth Edition, James S. Nairne Chapter 5 Processing in the Retina Rod and cone cells pass information to bipolar cells, then to ganglion cells Ganglion cells have receptive fields, meaning: Input received from a number of other cells Responds only to a particular pattern Many have center-surround fields Respond to light in middle, not on periphery, of receptive field
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Psychology, Fifth Edition, James S. Nairne Chapter 5
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Psychology, Fifth Edition, James S. Nairne Chapter 5
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Psychology, Fifth Edition, James S. Nairne Chapter 5
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Psychology, Fifth Edition, James S. Nairne Chapter 5 Identifying Message Components Neural messages travel to brain via optic nerve Splits at optic chiasm Information from right visual field goes to left hemisphere; info from left visual field goes to right hemisphere Next stops: lateral geniculate nucleus and superior colliculus
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Psychology, Fifth Edition, James S. Nairne Chapter 5
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Psychology, Fifth Edition, James S. Nairne Chapter 5 Identifying Features: The Visual Cortex From lateral geniculate nucleus, messages relayed to parts of the occipital lobe that process vision (“visual cortex”) Visual cortex picks out and identifies components called features Example: Bars of light at a particular angle; corners
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Psychology, Fifth Edition, James S. Nairne Chapter 5
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Psychology, Fifth Edition, James S. Nairne Chapter 5 Higher Level Feature Detection
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chapter5 - Psychology, Fifth Edition, James S. Nairne...

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