History Lectures

History Lectures - Friday Lecture Contexts of Colonization...

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Friday, September 28, 2007 - Lecture Contexts of Colonization European Background Two Test Cases Spain England Native Migrations and Conflicts Importance of Iroquois African Considerations Slave trade Slavery Relationship between Europeans and Africans The “Columbian Exchange” Transformation of the Ecology of four Continents: Movements of these things from Europe to America They destroyed population, decimated native groups, transformed new weeds, new wraths People Plants Animals Commodities Effects systematically unequal Worked in favor of Europeans Negative for Africans and Natives
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Constructing an Atlantic World Importance of the Maritime (water transportation) Unequal Exchange New Worlds for All Looking East not West Competing Empires An Age of Empires Huge empires with POWER France-Canada/Caribbean; England French, Dutch, British, Spanish Nations vs. Empire Land and water British America The 17 th century establishment and organization of British colonies in North America Mature colonial societies of the early 18 th century Centrality of slavery Legacies of Empire Monday, October 1, 2007 - Lecture Colonial Hall of Mirrors Stories of Origins “Foundings” Jamestown (1607)
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early heroism, first representative government Plymouth (1620) Pilgrims, first Thanksgiving, religious freedom Massachusetts Bay (1629) Puritans Philadelphia (1776, 1787) Seperation of church and state, founding of new nation Narratives of Beginnings—And Endings Jamestown beginning meant end of other forms of life English and Powhatan Settlements 1607-1611 English Settlements About seven Many Powhawtan Jamestown settlement=first stable settlement Story-Pocahontas and John Smith A Founding Myth of America Relationship Between Natives and Europeans Beginning of Relationship Civilization and Savagery English vs. Natives Appeal of Superiority Pocahontas drawn to this and Smith Love
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Power of love Power of culture differences Image of Pocahontas as Native American Romantic notion Depicted as beautiful Naturalized Part of nature American picture Image of Smith and Pocahontas From US capitol Style: Neoclassical Smith about to be executed Pocahontas rushing toward him Scholarly Retellings, 1969 “Pocahontas did not share her people’s hostility, and it is that fact that catapulted her into history… Encountering a new culture, she responded with curiosity and concern, and she accepted the potential for change and development within herself. She rose surely and dramatically above the ignorance and savagery of her peoples.” Pocahontas Born: 1595-1596 Fell in love with John Smith when she was 12! Daughter of Powhatan
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History Lectures - Friday Lecture Contexts of Colonization...

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