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伯格曼电影+(V-

伯格曼电影+(V-

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  The Film of     Ingmar Bergman ¨ ‡ ”“
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Ingmar Bergman (1918-2007)
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Ingmar Bergman (1918-2007) Sven Nykvist (1922-2002)
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Ingmar Bergman (1918-2007)
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Ingmar Bergman (1918-2007)
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Ingmar Bergman and Liv Ulman
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Three Influences on Bergman’s works Cultural influence — the social milieu in  which he was raised Literary influences — Strindberg and  Existentialism Religious influence — the Lutheran  heritage
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   Cultural Influence On the surface, Sweden is a prosperous, industrious and wealthy nation, considered by some as almost a Utopia that this world has yet produced. However, the Swedes are not a happy and contented people. They are cool, distant and have trouble expressing their feelings. They are plague by a very high suicide rate and seem to be marked by a strong sense of despair and disappointment, just like the land which is isolated both geographically and psychologically.
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Cultural Influence Such a mindset is caused by its separation from European and world involvement as seen in the country’s neutrality during WWII. The isolation from involvement in the sufferings of the world around it did not create a sense of relief but succeeded in instilling a deep sense of guilt and anxiety in the Swedish mentality. Unable to share the suffering, the Swedes have withdrawn from any real sense of community.
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  Cultural Influence Bergman’s films successfully catch the Swedish national personality and portray their inner suffering. They wrestle with the problem of silence, both human and divine, and with the breakdown of communication among people.
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Tystnaden (1963)
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  Smultronstället (1957)
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   Literary influences      August Strindberg (1849-1912) Stylized archetype of the male and female engaged in combat Representation of man and God in conflict
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  Literary influences Existentialism the concern with the individual’s search for meaning the antagonism toward a dependence on reason as the prime defining characteristic of man the distrust of authority the emphasis on the irrationality and absurdity of life the pessimism in the possibility of achieving and maintaining any real sense of community
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Søren Kierkegaard (1813-1855) Danish philosopher, theologian, and psychologist.
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