History - Thomas Molineaux History 128 Reading Response In this essay I will compare the competing themes of segregation and desegregation by

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Thomas Molineaux History 128 Reading Response In this essay I will compare the competing themes of segregation and desegregation by analyzing primary source documents and people from that time period. I will demonstrate that desegregation had unforeseen effects on African-American’s sense of community and their culture, but still was enormously beneficial that can be seen by the progress today. These effects can be primarily seen when studying the court case: Brown v. Board of Education and the events that followed. According to the decision in Brown v. Board of education, the courts ruled that although the tangible features of the facilities may appear equal, there never can truly be anything justly called separate, but equal. This reasoning stems from the idea that separate, but equal facilities are inherently unequal and their very existence implies “inferiority as to their status in the community that may affect their hearts and minds in a way unlikely ever to be undone”. The court believed that the plaintiffs and others in similar situations were deprived of the equal protection of the laws guaranteed by the Fourteenth Amendment and ruled accordingly. According to the court, “Segregation of children in public schools solely on the basis of
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This note was uploaded on 11/16/2010 for the course SOCI 100 taught by Professor Mcgee during the Spring '10 term at East Carolina University .

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History - Thomas Molineaux History 128 Reading Response In this essay I will compare the competing themes of segregation and desegregation by

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