Poli 271 Thomas Molineaux Essay

Poli 271 Thomas Molineaux Essay - Thomas Molineaux POLI 271...

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Thomas Molineaux POLI 271 Recitation Monday 4pm Locke is considered by many to be one of the greatest optimistic thinkers of our past. His philosophy regarding politics contrasts many of the ideals that Machiavelli believes in. One of these sharp contrasts is their definition of authority. Generally Locke sees three types of authority: natural, conventional, and political. Although we find that he describes three types of authority, generally speaking, conventional and political are extremely similar and hard to distinguish in his writings. The only real difference between the two is that in a political authoritative state there are citizens and a society, but a conventional authority usually only consists of a small community. To truly understand Locke’s philosophy the reader has to know how Locke defines each of these types of authorities and what he expects from each one. He believes that authority begins in the state of nature. There are an abundance of resources. People are spread out and live not only as individuals, but as equals. Locke’s idea of the state of nature compares to the Garden of Eden and he himself chooses to reference it as well. In the Garden of Eden there was only one authority: God. God never granted Adam authority and therefore Locke found that it didn’t make sense for Kings to proclaim that they inherited their power through hereditary lineage going back to Adam. Locke believed this God mandated power passed down was nonexistent because authority was never given to Adam in the first place. The problems with the state of nature are primarily two things. First of all as people procreate and increase the population, the demand for resources increase and therefore cause the supply to decrease. The second and more important problem with the state of nature according to Locke is that there is no earthly authority to appeal to. When
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Thomas Molineaux POLI 271 Recitation Monday 4pm disagreements occur and there is no one to appeal to, this quickly evolves from a peaceful state of nature into a state of war. Locke believes that the two states are fundamentally
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This note was uploaded on 11/16/2010 for the course SOCI 100 taught by Professor Mcgee during the Spring '10 term at East Carolina University .

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Poli 271 Thomas Molineaux Essay - Thomas Molineaux POLI 271...

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