Lecture 39

Lecture 39 - Last Meeting Physics 231 General University...

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1 Physics 231 General University Physics Lecture 39 Lecture 9 1 Last Meeting ± Doppler Effect Lecture 9 2 Today ± Superposition and Interference ± Beats Lecture 9 3 Superposition Example ± Two pulses are traveling in opposite directions ² The wave function of the pulse moving to the right is y 1 and for the one moving to the left is y 2 ± The pulses have the same speed but different shapes ± The displacement of the elements is positive for both Lecture 9 4 Superposition Example, cont ± When the waves start to overlap (b), the resultant wave function is y 1 + y 2 ± When crest meets crest (c ) the resultant wave has a larger amplitude than either of the original waves Lecture 9 5 Superposition Example, final ± The two pulses separate ± They continue moving in their original directions ± The shapes of the pulses remain unchanged
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2 Lecture 9 6 Superposition Principle ± If two or more traveling waves are moving through a medium, the resultant value of the wave function at any point is the algebraic sum of the values of the wave functions of the individual waves ± Waves that obey the superposition principle are linear waves ² For mechanical waves, linear waves have amplitudes much smaller than their wavelengths Lecture 9 7 Superposition in a Stretch Spring ± Two equal, symmetric pulses are traveling in opposite directions on a stretched spring ± They obey the
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This note was uploaded on 11/16/2010 for the course PHY 231 taught by Professor Ellis during the Spring '08 term at Kentucky.

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Lecture 39 - Last Meeting Physics 231 General University...

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