27-Monks - Hist 151 9/27/10 Monasticism, ca. 300-600: Sign...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Hist 151 9/27/10 Monasticism, ca. 300-600: Sign of the times Ancient “influences” Medieval “influences” A hybrid product? But first…why monasticism matters? o For a thousand years, monks (and nuns) represented the ideal form of Christian practice (what would later be called the ‘vita contemplativa’) o In their efforts to keep Christians “honest” (i.e., living up to their own stated ideals) they launched many influential reforms o As collectors/copyists/students, they preserved the past Cassiodoras (d. 585) – monk and statesman o A roman statesman who served an Ostrogothic king, a worried witness to political and culture disintegration, a founder of a monastery, and author of introductions to divine and human readings, a compendium and guide for reading that would shape European culture The Ancient Context o Embracing the scorn. Constantine’s Edict of Toleration (313) provoked “flight” and a new turn to asceticism. As Tertullian (d. 220) had said, “what hath Athens to do with
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 11/16/2010 for the course HIST 151 taught by Professor Smith during the Spring '10 term at City College of San Francisco.

Page1 / 2

27-Monks - Hist 151 9/27/10 Monasticism, ca. 300-600: Sign...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online