Temperature and Inhibitors when experimenting with Catalase Reaction Rate

Temperature and Inhibitors when experimenting with Catalase Reaction Rate

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Temperature and Inhibitors when experimenting with Catalase Reaction Rate Catalyst can be defined roughly as a substance that speeds up the rate of chemical Reactions (L.L. Hester et al.,2010). This is an extremely important feature in all living things as chemical reactions are the basis of all of our daily functions. The certain catalyst living things use for our chemical reactions are certain proteins known as enzymes. While there are many different types of enzymes throughout nature, the topic of this experiment is the very efficient enzyme known as catalase. One of the most important functions of catalase in the body is its ability to break down hydrogen peroxide within the blood stream (L.L. Hester et al., 2010). Without its ability to do this, the draw backs would be extremely fatal. In the experiment, catalase will be put to the test by adding multiple variables into the solution it is intended to breakdown. One of these such variables is the use of inhibitors. As virtual chembook defines them, an inhibitor is a molecule that interferes with the enzyme to
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This note was uploaded on 11/16/2010 for the course BIO 101 taught by Professor Stein during the Spring '07 term at South Carolina.

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Temperature and Inhibitors when experimenting with Catalase Reaction Rate

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