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lecture 19 - Lecture 19 Succession Succession and Stability...

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Lecture 19 - Succession 1 1 Succession and Stability Succession and Stability Chapter 20 Chapter 20 Introduction to Succession Primary Succession Primary Succession Secondary Succession Secondary Succession Disturbance Ecosystem Recovery Ecosystem Recovery Mechanisms of Succession Mechanisms of Succession Community and Ecosystem Stability Community and Ecosystem Stability 2 Chapter 20 - Succession: Definitions Chapter 20 - Succession: Definitions Succession: Gradual change in plant and animal communities in an area following animal communities in an area following disturbance. Primary succession Primary succession Secondary succession Secondary succession Climax Community: Late successional Late successional community 3 Primary Succession at Glacier Bay Primary Succession at Glacier Bay CONCEPT: CONCEPT: Ecological succession usually involves Ecological succession usually involves increases in species diversity as well as changes in species composition. Reiners et.al. studied changes in plant diversity during succession at Glacier Bay, Alaska. succession at Glacier Bay, Alaska. Retreating glacier left newly exposed rock Species richness Not all groups increased in density throughout Not all groups increased in density throughout succession. succession. 4 Plant Succession at Glacier Bay Plant Succession at Glacier Bay Max. diversity Max. diversity by 100 years: by 100 years: trees, trees, mosses, mosses, lichens, tall lichens, tall shrubs shrubs
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Lecture 19 - Succession 2 5 Secondary Succession in Temperate Forests Essentially all U.S. forests are second growth; Essentially all U.S. forests are second growth; they have been cut down for lumber or farmland at least once. Succession of temperate U.S. forests is well documented, documented, Grasses succeeded by Grasses succeeded by succeeded by succeeded by succeeded by succeeded by Clearly different from succession in 6 40 years 1 month 15 Years Time Zero 5 years Secondary Succession: Old Field 7 Secondary Succession: Old Field - Forty Years Approaching climax community. 8 Animal Succession Animal Succession in Temperate Forests Forests Johnston Johnston and and Odum Odum found increases in bird diversity across the the successional successional sequence
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Lecture 19 - Succession 3 9 Short-Term Succession - 1.5 years Short-Term Succession - 1.5 years In the rocky intertidal , saw how intermediate disturbance (via wave action) maintained highest diversity on boulders.
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