RST Syllabus

RST Syllabus - RST 10 Ethical Eating Fall 2010 Instructor:...

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RST 10 Ethical Eating Fall 2010 Instructor: Professor Allison Coudert Office: Sproul 908 Office Hours: TR 1:30-3 and by appointment apcoudert@ucdavis.edu TA Mel Draper mldraper@ucdavis.edu READER Ariana Rundquist arundquist@ucdavis.edu The whole of nature is a conjugation of the verb to eat, in the active and passive” William Ralph Inge Course Description: In every culture food lies at the center of a complex value system that involves religious beliefs and rituals, social hierarchies, and gender distinctions. Food is the cement that binds groups together, but it also separates individuals according to age, wealth, status, and sex. Far from a natural product, food is a social construction and can only be “read” in specific cultural contexts. For example, the great 19th century French historian Jules Michelet attributed the French revolution to the consumption of coffee, but today coffee signifies the rest and relaxation associated with “coffee breaks.” Food connects the living with the dead and even with the gods. While the food that mothers provide will keep one alive, only male food offers eternal life. Food taboos are a central aspect of tribal as well as modern religions. Why do some foods pollute and not others? And why are foods gendered, even eroticized? Finally, we are not only what we eat, but we are how we eat and how we produce, distribute, and consume the food we eat. What, for example, does a “chicken nugget” tell us about modern food, modern life, and modern eating habits? It is the purpose of this course to introduce students to the complex and varied ethical, religious, and cultural meanings that food has had across the centuries and globe. Required Books (available at bookstore): Simon Blackburn, Being Good: A Short Introduction to Ethics . Michael Pollan, The Omnivore’s Dilemma. Readings listed in the syllabus can be found as PDFs on Smartsite under Resources. Requirements and Grading: Grading for students taking the course for 2 credits: 1) Five one-page responses to the reading. Be sure to look at the syllabus for due dates because late papers will not be accepted ( 70% of your grade). As you will see, there are 7 response questions in the syllabus. This means that you can
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choose to leave out two or, if you chose to write all of them, we will drop the lowest grades and only count your best 5 responses. This means that if you start off the class with a whimper, you can still end with a BANG ! 2) Pop in-class quizzes ( 30% of your grade) Grading for students taking course for 4 credits: 1) Five one-page responses to the reading. Be sure to look at the syllabus for due dates because late papers will not be accepted ( 40% of the grade). As you will see, there are 7 response questions in the syllabus. This means that you can choose to leave out two or, if you chose to write all of them, we will drop the lowest grades and only count your best 5 responses. This means that if you start off the class with a whimper, you can still end
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This note was uploaded on 11/15/2010 for the course RST 79313 taught by Professor Coudert during the Fall '10 term at UC Davis.

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RST Syllabus - RST 10 Ethical Eating Fall 2010 Instructor:...

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