MODULE D

MODULE D - MODULE D: WAITING-LINE MODELS TRUE/FALSE 1....

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MODULE D: WAITING-LINE MODELS TRUE/FALSE 1. Waiting-line models are useful to operations in such diverse settings as service systems, maintenance activities, and shop-floor control. True (Introduction, easy) 2. The two characteristics of the waiting line itself are whether its length is limited or unlimited and the discipline of the people or items in it. True (Characteristics of a waiting-line system, easy) 3. A waiting-line system has three parts: the size of the arrival population, the behavior of arrivals, and the statistical distribution of arrivals. False (Characteristics of a waiting-line system, easy) 4. A copy center has five machines that serve many customers throughout the day; the waiting-line system for copy service has an infinite population while the waiting-line system for copier maintenance has a finite population True (Characteristics of a waiting-line system, easy) 5. In queuing problems, arrival rates are generally described by the normal probability distribution. False (Characteristics of a waiting-line system, moderate) 6. Balk and renege are elements of queue discipline. False (Characteristics of a waiting-line problem, easy) 7. A hospital emergency room always follows a first-in, first-served queue discipline in the interest of fairness. False (Characteristics of a waiting-line system, moderate) 8. In queuing problems, the term “renege” refers to the fact that some customers leave the queue before service is completed. True (Characteristics of a waiting-line system, moderate) 9. A waiting-line system with one waiting line and three sequential processing stages is a multichannel single-phase system. False (Characteristics of a waiting-line problem, easy) 10. If the service time within a queuing system is constant, the service rate can be easily described by a negative exponential distribution. False (Characteristics of a waiting-line system, moderate) 11. The cost of waiting decreases as the service level increases. True (Queuing costs, moderate) 12. LIFS (last-in, first-served) is a common queue discipline, most often seen where people, not objects, form the waiting line.
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False (Characteristics of a waiting-line problem, moderate) 13. A bank office with five tellers, each with a separate line of customers, exhibits the characteristics of a multi-phase queuing system. False (Characteristics of a waiting-line system, moderate) 14. In the analysis of queuing models, the Poisson distribution often describes arrival rates and service times are often described by the negative exponential distribution. True (Characteristics of a waiting-line system, moderate) 15. The study of waiting lines calculates the cost of providing good service but does not value the cost of customers' waiting time. False (Queuing costs, moderate)
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This note was uploaded on 11/17/2010 for the course MGT 3373 taught by Professor Kitahara during the Spring '09 term at Troy.

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MODULE D - MODULE D: WAITING-LINE MODELS TRUE/FALSE 1....

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