thinkpython - Think Python How to Think Like a Computer...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–6. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Think Python How to Think Like a Computer Scientist Version 1.1.22 Think Python How to Think Like a Computer Scientist Version 1.1.22 Allen Downey Green Tea Press Needham, Massachusetts Copyright 2008 Allen Downey. Printing history: April 2002: First edition of How to Think Like a Computer Scientist . August 2007: Major revision, changed title to How to Think Like a (Python) Programmer . June 2008: Major revision, changed title to Think Python: How to Think Like a Computer Scientist . Green Tea Press 9 Washburn Ave Needham MA 02492 Permission is granted to copy, distribute, and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Doc- umentation License, Version 1.1 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and with no Back-Cover Texts. The GNU Free Documentation License is available from www.gnu.org or by writing to the Free Software Foundation, Inc., 59 Temple Place, Suite 330, Boston, MA 02111-1307, USA. The original form of this book is L A T E X source code. Compiling this L A T E X source has the effect of generating a device-independent representation of a textbook, which can be converted to other formats and printed. The L A T E X source for this book is available from http://www.thinkpython.com Preface The strange history of this book In January 1999 I was preparing to teach an introductory programming class in Java. I had taught it three times and I was getting frustrated. The failure rate in the class was too high and, even for students who succeeded, the overall level of achievement was too low. One of the problems I saw was the books. They were too big, with too much unnecessary detail about Java, and not enough high-level guidance about how to program. And they all suffered from the trap door effect: they would start out easy, proceed gradually, and then somewhere around Chapter 5 the bottom would fall out. The students would get too much new material, too fast, and I would spend the rest of the semester picking up the pieces. Two weeks before the first day of classes, I decided to write my own book. My goals were: Keep it short. It is better for students to read 10 pages than not read 50 pages. Be careful with vocabulary. I tried to minimize the jargon and define each term at first use. Build gradually. To avoid trap doors, I took the most difficult topics and split them into a series of small steps. Focus on programming, not the programming language. I included the minimum useful subset of Java and left out the rest. I needed a title, so on a whim I chose How to Think Like a Computer Scientist . My first version was rough, but it worked. Students did the reading, and they understood enough that I could spend class time on the hard topics, the interesting topics and (most important) letting the students practice....
View Full Document

Page1 / 234

thinkpython - Think Python How to Think Like a Computer...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 6. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online