November 12 - When does frustration produce aggression We are close to a goal that is blocked(strength of frustration Frustration seems arbitrary

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November 12, 2010 From Monday-Wednesday Instinct theories of aggression Social influences on aggression Learning theories “Culture of honor” Quite Rage – Stanford Prison Experiment Power of immediate situation/roles/cues Frustration-Aggression Hypothesis Early study on “goal-blocking” in kids Kids must wait 20 minutes before they get to play with a toy. Strong version If X then Y and if Y, there must have been X Problems Ability to restrain self Aggressive behavior among goal-successful people Not necessarily frustrated
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Unformatted text preview: When does frustration produce aggression? We are close to a goal that is blocked (strength of frustration) Frustration seems arbitrary – something is not fair Frustration involves insult or attack Reducing Aggression Reduce frustration Punish aggressive behavior Model non-aggression ** Catharsis – “letting off steam” ** ** Not much evidence showing that the last two are very effective. Media and Aggression – TV, music, video games...
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This note was uploaded on 11/17/2010 for the course SOC 330P taught by Professor Maryrose during the Fall '10 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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November 12 - When does frustration produce aggression We are close to a goal that is blocked(strength of frustration Frustration seems arbitrary

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