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Feb. 19, 2010 Lecture

Feb. 19, 2010 Lecture - and women separate from their human...

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LECTURE: Feb. 19, 2010 Significance (essay) analysis; how they’re interrelated; what are you trying to deconstruct: 123-219 **1) How does “imported colonialism” as described in Impossible Subjects compare to “internal colonialism” described in Disposable Domestics (pg. 101--‐102)? Compare and contrast the politics of race, gender, and class in the case of the nanny visa presented by Grace Chang with the Bracero Program as discussed by Mae Ngai. Be sure to explain how the myths of immigrant dependence and immigrant hyper--‐ fertility work within what Chang calls “internal colonialism”. 2) “All of these policies are aimed at the same objective: to capture the labor of immigrant men
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Unformatted text preview: and women separate from their human needs or those of their dependents.” Grace Chang, Disposable Domestics , Pg. 11 please explain this quote in its context, addressing how the politics of race, class, gender, and labor are involved in the structuring of immigration policies and social welfare policies aimed at immigrants. Compare and contrast one example from Disposable Domestics with one example from Impossible Subjects to explain your answer. Be sure to reference frameworks from lecture explaining the interconnection of race, gender, class, and labor in your answer. Framework: public v. private sphere, hyper-fertility, impoerted colonialism LECTURE, FEB 19, 2010...
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