Intro to Java Web-Notes_Part31

Intro to Java Web-Notes_Part31 - 10 33 6 —1 There were 3...

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Unformatted text preview: 10 33 6 —1 There were 3 numbers. 7. Read a series of positive integers from the keyboard. Keep reading until the user enters a negative number. Report the number of odd values entered (use %2 to determine if a value is odd or even). 10 33 6 47 9O 21 88 —1 There were 3 odd numbers. 8. Read exactly seven integers from the user. Report the sum of the numbers and the number of even numbers. Also report the sum of the odd numbers and the sum of the even numbers. 12 3O 6O 31 9O 11 15 Even numbers: 4 Even sum: 192 Odd numbers: 3 Odd sum: 57 9. Generate ten random numbers in the range 1 to 100. Report the number of values that were 50 or greater (print them to the console). 76 52 95 80 10. Generate random numbers in the range 1 to 10. Keep generating the numbers (and printing them out) until the value seven is generated. Stop the program once a seven is generated. 00K)ng ll. Generate random numbers in the range 1 to 10. Keep generating the numbers (and printing them out) until the value seven is generated. Stop the program once a seven is generated. Report the number of numbers generated and rint the sum of those numbers. 9 3 There were 2 numbers, for a total of 12. Solutions to selected exercises. Some Extra Problems If you are eager to try a few more looping problems, then here are a few more. The for Loop The number of iterations of a counting loop can be determined from its starting value, ending value, and the amount size of the increment. For example, this loop starts at one, ends at ten, and increments by one -- it will have exactly ten iterations: int i = l; // start at 1 while (i <: 10) // end at 10 i // ... do something here ... i++; // increment by 1 l A common shorthand for a counting loop is the for loop. The for loop pulls the starting, ending, and increment values onto one line: for (int i = l; i <= 10; i++) i // ... do something here ... } Even though these three features appear on one line, they take their affect exactly in the places shown in the while loop at the start of this section. This for loop behaves exactly like the while loop shown above. Experienced programmers often use the for loop because it compactly describes the core features of a counting loop. gm - About Us Copyright © 2006 by Kiowok, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA ...
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Intro to Java Web-Notes_Part31 - 10 33 6 —1 There were 3...

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