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CenterGravity - Center of Gravity Center of gravity point...

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Center of Gravity
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Center of gravity - point at the center of an object’s weight distribution, where the force of gravity can be considered to act. For a uniform sphere, this will be the center. For an asymmetrical object it is closer to the heavier end.
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If the object is made of materials of different densities, the center of gravity will not be at the geometrical center.
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For a symmetrical object of uniform density, the center of gravity is at the geometrical center. The object behaves as if its weight were concentrated at this point. That is why you can balance a meter stick with a single upward force at this point.
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When you hang an object from a single point, the center of gravity will be at or directly below that point. Hang the object and draw a straight line down. Hang the object from another point and draw a straight line down. Where the lines meet is the center of gravity.
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The center of gravity may be outside of the object. Where is the center of gravity of a donut?
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If an object’s center of gravity is above its area of support, it will not topple. If the center of gravity extends beyond its area of support, it will topple.
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Why doesn’t this tower topple?
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Why doesn’t this tower topple? Its center of gravity is above its base.
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How do they construct these buses so that they do not topple, even when tipped at 28°?
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How do they construct these buses so that they do not topple, even when tipped at 28°? They place most of the weight in the lower part of the bus, lowering its center of gravity.
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Why are 4-wheel- drive trucks generally less stable than 2- wheel-drive trucks?
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Why are 4-wheel- drive trucks generally
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