Kin3514_ch10

Kin3514_ch10 - Chapter10 LinearKinetics...

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Copyright © 2009 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins  Click to edit Master subtitle style Chapter 10
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Copyright © 2009 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins  Kirk starts squatting down on a scale and then comes to a stop  after 4 seconds. Kirk is the object of analysis (the scale is not) The force Kirk is applying to the scale is changing The force applied to Kirk is equal to the force Kirk applied Newton’s third law should be used A reference system with positive vertical direction is needed 
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Copyright © 2009 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins  Objectives 1. Define force and discuss the characteristics of a force. 2. Compose and resolve forces according to vector operations. 3. Discuss Newton's law of gravitation and how it affects human  movement. 4. State Newton's three laws of motion and their relevance to  human movement. 5. Differentiate between a contact and a noncontact force.
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Copyright © 2009 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins  Objectives 8. Define the impulse-momentum relationship. 9. Define the work-energy relationship. 10. Discuss the concepts of internal and external work. 11. Discuss the forces acting on an object as it moves along a  curved path. 12. Discuss the relationships between force, pressure, work,  energy, and power.
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Copyright © 2009 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins  Linear Kinetics Kinematics is the description of motion. Kinetics deals with the causes of motion. This chapter deals with the causes of translatory motion, hence  linear kinetics. The concept of force is the basis for understanding linear kinetics.
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Copyright © 2009 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins  Force  Force is a vector. Force is a push, pull, rub (friction), or blow (impact). Force causes or tends to cause motion (acceleration) or a change  in shape of an object.  Force vectors are usually drawn as  arrows indicating direction and  magnitude.
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Copyright © 2009 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins  Force Vector (magnitude and direction) Angle Point of application Line of application Force vectors are usually drawn as  arrows indicating direction and  magnitude.
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Copyright © 2009 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins  FIGURE 10-1 Characteristics of a force for an internal muscular force (A) and an  external force generated on the ground in the high jump (B).
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Kin3514_ch10 - Chapter10 LinearKinetics...

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