Kin4512_Chapter_10

Kin4512_Chapter_10 - Voluntary Movements of Infancy...

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Click to edit Master subtitle style Voluntary Movements of Infancy -Chapter 10-
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“Voluntary movement is the ultimate expression in the striated muscle of the integrated effects of a host of cortical and subcortical facilitory and inhibitory influences” Wyke, 1975
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Voluntary movements Involuntary movements Reflexes during first year Most disappear as cerebral cortical control assumes command of movement production Voluntary movements Begin to appear at about fourth week of life Initially head, neck, eyes controlled rudimentary movements of future, advanced movements
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Voluntary movements 1. Postural Control (Stability) Head control to attainment of upright posture (standing) 2. Locomotion Crawling and then creeping 3. Manual Control (Manipulation) Grasping and releasing
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Categorizing the Movements Cephalocaudal pattern of development Proximodistal pattern of development Importance of perceptual systems
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Postural Control: Head
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Postural Control: Body mo mo mo mo mo 9-10  mo 12   m Chest Rolling Sitting Standing
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Questions about sitting Is body control important? These early forms of movement are crucial for attaining more advanced movements What are the benefits from independent sitting? Being able to interact with environment
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Body Control Importance? Upright posture frees hands for other tasks
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Benefits of Independent Sitting: Research Example (Rochat, 1992) Ability to self-sit” on early development of eye-hand coordination Sitters vs. non-sitters (5-8 mo.) 4 positions when presented with objects Seated Reclined Prone (75 degrees from floor) Supine
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Benefits of Independent Sitting: Research Example (Rochat, 1992) Results: 89% of time, non-sitters made contact, 98% for sitters; supine position least likely for both groups; sitters used one hand grasping more Study demonstrated importance of self-sitting on early eye-hand coordination
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Prone locomotion Crawling- Less mature form of locomotion Creeping – Elevated, efficient 7 mo 9-12 mo 7-8 mo
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This note was uploaded on 11/18/2010 for the course KIN 4512 taught by Professor Reeve during the Fall '09 term at LSU.

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Kin4512_Chapter_10 - Voluntary Movements of Infancy...

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