Hrincevich+CH+10+student+outline

Hrincevich+CH+10+student+outline - Chapter 10 Gene...

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Chapter 10: Gene Expression and Regulation 0
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Marvelous Mussel Adhesive 0
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1) 2) Steps from DNA to Proteins 0
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The Linkage Between DNA and Protein
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How Are Genes and Proteins Related? 1. 2. 0
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Most Genes Contain the Information for the Synthesis of a Single Protein
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Supplements Added to Medium none Normal Neurospora ornithine enzyme 1 gene B gene A enzyme 2 arginine amino acid needed in protein synthesis citrulline Growth characteristics of normal and mutant Neurospora on simple medium with different supplements show that defects in a single gene lead to defects in a single enzyme. The biochemical pathway for synthesis of the amino acid arginine involves two steps, each catalyzed by a different enzyme. Normal Neurospora can synthesize arginine, citrulline, and ornithine. Conclusions Mutant A grows only if arginine is added. It cannot synthesize arginine because it has a defect in enzyme 2; gene A is needed for synthesis of arginine. Mutant B grows if either arginine or citrulline are added. It cannot synthesize arginine because it has a defect in enzyme 1. Gene B is needed for synthesis of citrulline. A B Mutants with single gene defect arginine citrulline ornithine 0
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DNA Provides Instructions to Protein Synthesis via RNA Intermediates
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DNA vs. RNA 0
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A Nucleotide Subunit of RNA phosphate group sugar (ribose) uracil (base) 0
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Three Types of Ribonucleic Acid (RNA) Involved in Gene Expression
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This note was uploaded on 11/18/2010 for the course BIOL 1001 taught by Professor Minor during the Spring '08 term at LSU.

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Hrincevich+CH+10+student+outline - Chapter 10 Gene...

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