Ch13Learning - Learning HOW DO WE LEARN AND REMEMBER? BRAIN...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–23. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
HOW DO WE LEARN AND REMEMBER? BRAIN & BEHAVIOR CHAPTER 13 – PART I Learning
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Learning A change in an organism’s behavior as a result of experience. Changes in the brain: neuroplasticity . Development Preferences Neurological disease LEARNING
Background image of page 2
Memory The ability to recall or recognize previous experience. Implies a mental representation of previous experience. Memory trace: corresponds to some type of physical change in the brain. We usually study changes in behavior .
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Studying Learning & Memory in the Lab How do we ask an animal what it knows? Are there problems in asking people what they know? Match the test to the species: Rats – Morris water maze, t-maze, … Monkeys – television monitors, puzzle solving, … Humans – paper & pencil, television monitors, …
Background image of page 4
Pavlovian Conditioning (Classical Conditioning) Animals learn the association between two stimuli (such as the presentation of food and a tone). They show that they have learned by giving the same response to both stimuli.
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Pavlovian Conditioning
Background image of page 6
Pavlovian Conditioning Today Eye-blink conditioning.
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Pavlovian Conditioning today Fear conditioning
Background image of page 8
Pavlovian Conditioning Unconditioned Stimulus (UCS) Unconditioned Response (UCR) Presentation of food Salivation Conditioned Stimulus (CS) is paired with US Bell paired with presentation of food CS now elicits the same response as the UCS, which is now the Conditioned Response (CR) Bell alone elicits salivation
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Pavlovian Conditioning
Background image of page 10
Instrumental Conditioning (Operant Conditioning) The subject demonstrates that it has learned the association between its actions and the consequences by the increasing speed at which it can perform the task. Association between actions and reinforcement.
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Thorndike’s Puzzle Boxes
Background image of page 12
Thorndike’s Puzzle Boxes
Background image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
B.F. Skinner
Background image of page 14
Instrumental Conditioning Instrumental learning is not localized to any particular circuit in the brain. The circuits needed vary with the actual requirements of the task.
Background image of page 15

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Morris Water Maze Visuospatial Learning
Background image of page 16
Morris Water Maze
Background image of page 17

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Morris Water Maze Learning Set
Background image of page 18
Morris Water Maze
Background image of page 19

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Morris Water Maze
Background image of page 20
Instrumental Conditioning For Sale
Background image of page 21

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Memory Implicit Memory in which subjects can demonstrate knowledge but cannot explicitly retrieve the information. Explicit
Background image of page 22
Image of page 23
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 11/19/2010 for the course PSYCH 2275 taught by Professor Weiner,j. during the Spring '10 term at CUNY Hunter.

Page1 / 52

Ch13Learning - Learning HOW DO WE LEARN AND REMEMBER? BRAIN...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 23. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online