4bl-lab5 - Ross Miller 503290136 Lab 5: Magnetism Partners:...

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Ross Miller 503290136 Lab 5: Magnetism Partners: Sam Ahn and Andre Svadjian TA: Steve Suh Session 6
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Introduction: The purpose of this experiment was to verify and examine the basics of magnetism. These basic principles include diamagnetism, paramagnetism, ferromagnetism, ampere’s law, and basic laws of magnetism. Theory: Section 1: From the Biot-Savart law we know that a straight, infinitely long, wire carrying a constant DC current along the Z axis creates a magnetic field for any point a distance of R away from it that travels in the counterclockwise direction, the magnetic field will not vary as you move around the circle and will follow the equation B φ 0 I/(2 r) . Unfortunately in a laboratory setting it is impossible to get a current line that is infinitely long and constant, and all DC circuits must be closed. We instead use two coaxial conductors, each carrying a current flowing in the opposite directions. It is actually more practical for our lab if we instead use a thin wire coiled between the two cylinders so a much smaller current is necessary. This set up is shown on the top right picture, and is called a toroidal coil. The dimensions for the one we have in the laboratory are: N=100, a=3.2cm, b=18cm, h=46 cm, and the wire spacing is about 1cm apart. The voltage applied is 20 volts. The current is read at .9V. Section 2: WE have ourselves a coil of N=500 turns, with a radius of 5 cm. The resistance of this coil is measured to be at 270Ω. We measure the magnetic field along the axis line for various distances to test and see if the biot savart law of B= μ 0 NI/[2R*(1+(z/R)^2)^1.5]. We also measure the magnetic field along the plane of the coil and see how it varies.
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Section 3: Different materials exhibit different properties when exposed to a magnetic field. Some create internal eddy currents which oppose the magnetic field that is being introduced and repel it, these materials are called diamagnetic. Other materials create a magnetic field that acts in the same direction as the magnetic field being applied which attracts it, these materials are called paramagnetic. Some materials may even be magnetized themselves and amplify any magnetic field that is being brought to it, these materials are called ferromagnetic and will be studied more in the next section. We look at glass, bismuth, iron oxide, graphite, iron, aluminum, tantalum, and copper. Section 4: As mentioned earlier, ferromagnetism will now be looked at. Ferromagnetic material has interesting and unique magnetic properties when compared to paramagnetic or diamagnetic materials. Ferromagnetic materials exhibit much stronger attraction in the presence of an applied magnetic field. When a magnetic field is applied to a ferromagnetic material, the material will almost seem to amplify the intensity of it, but when the magnetic field is taken away, there remains some small magnetic field being
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This note was uploaded on 11/12/2010 for the course PHYSICS 318017201 taught by Professor Carter during the Spring '10 term at UCLA.

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4bl-lab5 - Ross Miller 503290136 Lab 5: Magnetism Partners:...

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