6lab4bl - Samuel Ahn 203116737 Lab 6: speed of sound and...

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Samuel Ahn 203116737 Lab 6: speed of sound and light Lab partners: Ross Miller, Andre Svadjian Steve Suh; section 6
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Introduction The main purpose of this lab is to measure the speed and observe and study the characteristics of two waves: sound waves and electromagnetic waves. In this lab we want to measure the speed of sound and the speed of electromagnetic waves. To measure the speed, we basically, measure frequency and wavelength and calculate phase velocity. Because sound waves and electromagnetic waves are most associated with everyday life, we study these waves in this lab. Using a microphone and loudspeaker, we measure the distance the peak of each waves as we move a microphone along a measured track. For the speed of Electromagnetic waves, we simple use a cordless telephone as a wave source and measure the distance between the peaks. 5.1. Continuous Sound Waves Introduction In this portion of the lab, we use a microphone to detect sound waves from a loudspeaker and measure the wavelengths at different specified frequencies. Using this data, we calculate the sound speed and verified that sound waves are not dispersive. Background/Theory We know that the loudspeaker produces sound waves based upon the piezoelectric effect. Knowing this we know that the sound waves are detected with a microphone that generates an electrical signal which is proportional to the wave, which is seen on the oscilloscope. We than can calculate the velocity of the wave as a product of the frequency times and wavelength. We know that v wave = fλ, and ω/k where ω = 2πf and k = 2π/λ. Table 1: cm f(kHz) ω k ω/k 1.2 30.6 192168 523.3333 367.2 1.65 25.1 157628 380.6061 414.15 2 18.7 117436 314 374 2.45 15.2 95456 256.3265 372.4 3.5 10.16 63804.8 179.4286 355.6 6.75 5.17 32467.6 93.03704 348.975 Plot of ω vs. k
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340 350 360 370 380 390 400 410 420 0 10 20 30 40 Frequency Wavenumber Series1 Data Analysis/Error Analysis Looking at the table and graph, we see that generally, wavenumber increases as we increase frequency. For the most part, we also see our graph is linear with the exception of one point. This error may be caused by our rather rough estimates of the length of λ . Additionally, we need to take into account various interference that could have effected our readings. Not to forget, from out plot we calculate the slope of the best fit line to be about .009 which shows that the speed of sound does not vary much. 5.2 Propagation of Sound Pulses
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This note was uploaded on 11/12/2010 for the course PHYSICS 318017201 taught by Professor Carter during the Spring '10 term at UCLA.

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6lab4bl - Samuel Ahn 203116737 Lab 6: speed of sound and...

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