Waves - Nature of Matter and Energy Up to the nineteenth...

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Unformatted text preview: Nature of Matter and Energy Up to the nineteenth century, the prevailing theory was that matter and energy were distinct: Matter was: • made-up of particulate objects or atoms (called particulate theory ) • had measurable mass • their position in space could be specified. The motion of particles could be well explained by classical mechanics using Newton’s laws of motion. Energy was considered to travel and spread out through space in the form of waves as a result of vibrating disturbances (called wave theory ). Waves had: • no mass • were assumed to be continuous ( not particulate) • delocalized (diffused through space) • their position in space could not be specified As waves traveled through space and time they transferred energy from one location to another. The mathematical relationship between speed ( u ), frequency ( n ), and wavelength ( λ ) is given by the wave equation : u = ν λ one wave cycle displacement Direction of travel or time crests troughs 1 second (Frequency is the number of wavecycles per second. second....
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Waves - Nature of Matter and Energy Up to the nineteenth...

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