deBroglie - So, macroscopic objects such as baseballs or...

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For a moving particle or object traveling at a velocity, u , the equation can be rewritten as: m = h λ u where m is the mass of the particle or object in kg, h is Planck’s constant in J·s, λ is the wavelength of the associated wave in m, and u is the speed of the particle or object in m·s –1 . This equation, called de Broglie’s equation , established the wave-particle duality of matter. When the equation was rearranged to the following form, λ = h mu it allowed the calculation of the wavelength of the wave associated with a moving particle or object. The wavelength depended on the mass of the particle and how fast it was moving. The significance of the equation was that it provided a relationship between wavelength, a wavelike property, and mass, a particular property. The wavelength of the moving object was inversely related to its mass.
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Unformatted text preview: So, macroscopic objects such as baseballs or planets that had heavy masses would be expected to have wavelengths that were extremely small, so small their wavelike behavior would be undetectable, and would go unnoticed. However, microscopic objects such as electrons that had masses that were minuscule would be expected to have wavelengths that were substantial, and their wavelike behavior would be detectable and could not be ignored. Exercisede Broglie equation 1. Calculate the de Broglie wavelength in meters of a tennis ball with a mass of 9.00 x 10 2 kg that has a kinetic energy of 6.53 x 10 7 J. (Ans. 1.93 x 10 37 m) 2. What must the kinetic energy of a helium atom with a mass of 6.65 x 10 27 kg be so that it has a de Broglie wavelength of 2.80 x 10 12 m? (Ans. 4.21 x 10 18 J)...
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