Ch. 3 - Psychological Health

Ch. 3 - Psychological Health - SelfActualization...

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Self-Actualization 27/09/2010 19:44:00 Psychological health as the presence of wellness Hierarch of needs Physiological needs Safety Being loved Maintaining self-esteem Self-actualization  Self-actualization: The highest level of growth in Maslow’s hierarchy Realism: Know the difference between what is real and what they want Acceptance: Accept themselves as they are o Self-concept: The ideas, feelings, and perceptions one has about  oneself o Self-esteem: Satisfaction and confidence in oneself  Autonomy: Can direct themselves, acting independently of their social  environment o Inner-directed: Guided in behavior by an inner set of rules and values o Other-directed: Guided in behavior by the values and expectations of  others Authenticity: Not afraid to be themselves o Genuineness Capacity for intimacy: Can be physically and emotionally intimate  Creativity: Continually look at the world with renewed appreciation  What Psychological Health Is Not Normality: The psychological characteristics attributed to the majority of  people in a population at a given time  Never seeking help for personal problems does not prove you are  psychological healthy Can’t say people are “mentally ill” or “mentally healthy” based solely on the  presence or absence of symptoms  Cannot judge psychological health from the way people look
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Meeting Life’s Challenges 27/09/2010 19:44:00 Everyone must learn to cope successfully with new situations and new people 
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Growing Up Psychologically  Developing an Adult Identity o A unified sense of self, characterized by attitudes, beliefs, and ways of  acting that are genuinely one’s own  Know who they are, what they are capable of, what roles they  play, and their place among their peers  o Identities evolve as we interact with the world and make choices about  what we’d like to do and whom we’d like to model ourselves after  o Early identities are often modeled after parents o Early identities are rarely permanent o Developing an adult identity is an important part of psychological  wellness Identity crisis: Intern confusion about who one is  Developing Intimacy o Learning to live intimately with others and finding a productive role for  yourself in society are other tasks of adulthood People with established identities can form intimate  relationships and sexual unions  Developing Values and Purpose in Your Life o Values: Criteria for judging what is good and bad, which underlie one’s  moral decisions and behaviors  o As adults we need to asses how far we have evolved morally and what  values we actually have adopted 
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This note was uploaded on 11/19/2010 for the course HLTH 140 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at Maryland.

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Ch. 3 - Psychological Health - SelfActualization...

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