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Discussion+Starter+_1 - have a negative relationship...

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Discussion Starter #1--Due in lecture, Tuesday, 9/28 Understanding the meaning and interpretation of correlation coefficients can take some practice. We will spend a lot of time in lecture going over these concepts, so the purpose of this Discussion Starter is to get you thinking about some examples to be shared in class. Using the information provided on pages 73-78 of your textbook, please do the following: 1. Come up with TWO original (e.g. not included in the textbook or posted lecture slides) examples of a positive correlation. Although you do not need the statistics proving this is a significant correlation, you should pick variables that plausibly have a positive relationship. Describe what this relationship means (e.g. what happens to Variable A as Variable B changes). 2. Come up with TWO original (e.g. not included in the textbook or posted lecture slides) examples of a negative correlation. Although you do not need the statistics proving this is a significant correlation, you should pick variables that plausibly
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Unformatted text preview: have a negative relationship. Describe what this relationship means (e.g. what happens to Variable A as Variable B changes). 3. One of the biggest issues with correlational research is the “third variable problem” (see p. 77 of your textbook). From the following list of real life, strange but true correlations pick ONE and discuss what third variable(s) may be contributing to this relationship. a. Number of cavities in elementary school children negatively correlated with vocabulary. b. Number of storks sited in Holland positively correlated with number of babies born. c. Getting breast implants positively correlated with suicide. d. Owning a washing machine is positively correlated with dying in a car accident. All responses should be given in complete sentences, but you do not need to worry about structuring this into a coherent essay. Just be sure to address each question fully. Please be sure to include your name and student ID on your paper....
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  • Fall '09
  • PAOLI
  • Correlation and dependence, Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient, Spearman's rank correlation coefficient, Statistical dependence, significant correlation, Discussion Starter

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