co2emissionslab

co2emissionslab - CO2 Emissions from Fossil Fuel Burning...

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CO2 Emissions from Fossil Fuel Burning Lab Trevor Nestor Period 1
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Data:
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Questions: 1.) The above plot primarily shows that fuel use has grown exponentially in recent years and has ramifications in the amount of carbon dioxide that is released into the atmosphere. The graph of total levels of carbon released and solid fuel (coal) burned coincide almost exactly but increasingly diverge as liquid fuels became more mainstream and contributed to total carbon released in the 1900’s. In the late 1960’s, liquid fuel burning passed up solid fuel burning as the dominant source of carbon emissions. Gas fuel burning has remained the smallest contributor to total carbon emissions, but has nonetheless increased in recent years, especially in years past 1910. Presently, solid fuels and liquid fuels compete with one another as the main sources of carbon released into the atmosphere, but gaseous fuels have become more important, while in the past, only solid fuels made any noticeable contributions to total carbon released.
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2.) The per capita graph implies that per capita emissions increased from 1950 to about 1970
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This document was uploaded on 11/19/2010.

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co2emissionslab - CO2 Emissions from Fossil Fuel Burning...

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