Equiano and Native Americans found themselves in very contradictory historical circumstances

Equiano and Native Americans found themselves in very contradictory historical circumstances

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The role of cultural and  historical factors in  determining the acceptance of  Christianity in Creatures of  Empire and The Classic Slave  Narratives Name: Shubham Sinha SID: 22342523 GSI: Chris Shaw
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Equiano and Native Americans found themselves in very contradictory historical circumstances. While Equiano wholeheartedly converts himself to Christianity, Indians show a lack of interest for the English faith. Cultural roots accounted for the varying responses in reference to Christianity between Native Americans and Equiano in regards to colonial imperialism. Moreover, The Classic Slave Narratives account for Equiano’s individual experience while Creatures of Empire account for a relatively larger population of Native Americans conglomerated in their homeland, in their native habitat. The Classic Slave Narratives shows a contrasting background when compared to the Creatures of Empire . The former being the case of a black African slave converting to Christianity while the latter is about the failure of the propagation of Christianity in the new world of America. Creatures of Empire by Virginia De John portrays the conflicting views of native Americans and English imperialists regarding the concept of domestication of animals. Through, this conflict a great deal of information could be extracted and extrapolated which throws light on the faiths and beliefs of the Americans. Though English colonists ventured into America with the fondest hope of converting the uncivilized native population into Christian faith, their plans took a detour and the focus shifted towards the introduction of training livestock and better farming techniques to the natives. Nonetheless, a conflict is evident between them, which implicitly points towards a basic difference in their cultural roots, that is the way they perceived the world.
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If this linguistic peculiarity represented a genuine conceptual difference, it suggests that Indians did not conceive of the natural world in terms of a strict human-animal dichotomy…. .living beings 1 While English had sense of distinction between human and animals and had specific vocabulary for both the races, Native Americans had no such sense of distinction. This shows one of the wide gaps between the mentalities of the two cultures that were inherently so different. Christianity could not bridge this gap, as it was something, which was not suited for
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This note was uploaded on 11/22/2010 for the course DSSD 4432 taught by Professor Fdgdf during the Spring '10 term at University of California, Berkeley.

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Equiano and Native Americans found themselves in very contradictory historical circumstances

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