13_Plate Tectonics

13_Plate Tectonics - Lecture 13 Plate Tectonics Continental...

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Lecture 13 Plate Tectonics Continental drift Theory Introduced by Alfred L. Wegener in his book “The Origin of Continents and Oceans” in 1915 Pangea – the supercontinent which broke up during the late Permian = Gondwanaland + Laurasia Evidence for continental drift 1. Jigsaw puzzle fit 2. Fossils (e.g. Lystrosaurus, Cygnognathus, Mesosaurus, Glossopteris ) 3. Rock type and structural similarities - rocks found in one continent closely match (in age and type) those rocks found in the matching continent - matching mountain belts 4. Paleoclimatic evidence - layers of glacial deposits (same age) found in S. Africa and S. America, India and Australia - coal forms under tropical climates Sea Floor Spreading Hypothesis -introduced by Harry Hess in the early 1960s - New material is being formed along mid- oceanic ridges - Wilson Cycle Development of the theory - Extensive mapping of ocean floor ð young age of ocean floor (130 m.y.) - Oldest rocks from continents ð billions of years old Paleomagnetism
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This note was uploaded on 11/20/2010 for the course LIR 30 taught by Professor Thornley,k during the Spring '08 term at Santa Rosa.

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13_Plate Tectonics - Lecture 13 Plate Tectonics Continental...

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