Obesity Final HCA 240

Obesity Final HCA 240 - Obesity Final Obesity By Jessie Roe...

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Obesity Final: Obesity By: Jessie Roe HCA/240 Instructor: Dolton James September 25 th , 2010 ~ 1 ~
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Obesity Introduction Obesity is a growing epidemic in this country. Currently one in three Americans is overweight or obese (About Weight Loss Surgery, 2009). It strikes people both young and old and is the second leading cause of death in the United States (CDC). Obesity is determined as anyone with a body mass index or BMI over 30. For a person to qualify as morbidly obese they must have a BMI over 40. Most people today spend more time in front of a TV or playing video games then they do outside exercising. They drive everywhere instead of walking or riding a bike. The average American is now 23 pounds overweight. Obesity rates in the United States increased thirty seven percent between 1998 and 2006. Even children and teenagers are struggling with obesity and its effects. Fifteen percent of school age children are estimated to be obese (Nicole Lander, 2009). The American Heart Association recently released a study that showed more the ten percent of U.S. Children aged 2-5 are overweight. That figure is up seven percent from a decade ago. The CDC release a survey two years ago and found that nearly twenty three percent of children aged 9-13 were not physically active at all in their free time. The prevalence of children who were overweight tripled between 1980 and 2000 (Nicole Lander 2009). Causes The causes of obesity are many. People today take in more calories then they burn. They have poor diets and eating habits. They eat high calorie foods and visit fast food restaurants instead of taking the time to make something healthy at home. They eat most of their calories at night before they go to bed, so they have no chance to burn them off. They eat larger portion sizes instead of just eating until they are full and stopping. One of the biggest problems is the ~ 2 ~
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Obesity availability of sodas and other sugar-sweetened drinks. These drinks add almost 150 calories or more to the daily diet (Health Day 2009). The availability of super-sized drinks can of course add a lot more than 150 calories per day. The one liter bottles of soda can have over 400 calories if consumed all at once by one person. That has contributed to the high obesity numbers. We were and still are encouraged to overeat. Even when a lady is pregnant doctors encourage them to give in to some of their cravings because, obviously if they are craving it their body must not be getting something it needs for the growing baby. When a woman puts on too much weight during pregnancy, it can be very hard to lose the weight afterwards, if they can lose it at all (Mayo Clinic: Obesity). A lack of sleep also contributes to weight gain. If a person gets less then seven hours of sleep at night it causes hormonal changes. Those hormones increase their appetites and make them crave foods high in calories and carbohydrates (Mayo Clinic: Obesity). Certain medications can also cause weight gain. Anti-depressants, anti-seizure
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This note was uploaded on 11/20/2010 for the course HCA HCA 240 taught by Professor Doltonjames during the Fall '10 term at University of Phoenix.

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Obesity Final HCA 240 - Obesity Final Obesity By Jessie Roe...

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