Topic%2007%20_%20PCR%20_%20F10

Topic%2007%20_%20PCR%20_%20F10 - Cloning genes that code...

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Cloning genes that code for proteins Why do biochemists clone genes? proteins difficult to purify in quantity low abundant or transient proteins membrane proteins structure-function studies change the primary structure site-directed mutagenesis express in abundance crystalization
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PCR Work-horse of life science research isolate genes sequence DNA create mutations Gene Families & Multiple Proteins developmental expression tissue specific expression specific subcellular localiztion
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Beyond the biochemists interests: medicinal and population genetics Variations in a gene sequences associated with health issues: variation as a cause of disease variation as a resistance to disease Discovery of sequence polymorphisms opens a door for biochemical analysis on disease mechanisms (Exp 6: look for polymorphisms)
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Genome / DNA Sequence Available? Cloning Strategies isolation of a protein coding gene Eukaryote isolate gene isolate cDNA Prokaryote RT-PCR PCR PCR Primers Sense Primer & oligo-dT Isolate mRNA YES NO
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This note was uploaded on 11/21/2010 for the course MCB 120L 69059 taught by Professor Fairclough during the Fall '10 term at UC Davis.

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Topic%2007%20_%20PCR%20_%20F10 - Cloning genes that code...

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